Oil row rumbles on as crisis talks are postponed

An oil tanker is seen at the port of Ras al-Khair, about 185 km north of Dammam in eastern Saudi Arabia. (AFP / GIUSEPPE CACACE)
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Updated 05 April 2020

Oil row rumbles on as crisis talks are postponed

  • The “virtual” meeting is between 11 OPEC members led by Saudi Arabia and 10 other oil producers led by Russia

DUBAI: A crucial meeting of  OPEC+ producers on Monday aimed at cutting output and stabilizing the global oil market has been postponed.

“Monday is too early,” a Saudi oil official told Arab News. “OPEC needed more time to work out facts and figures.”

The “virtual” meeting, which may now take place later this week, is between 11 OPEC members led by Saudi Arabia and 10 other oil producers led by Russia.

It follows an “urgent” call by Saudi Arabia last week, and an intense round of telephone diplomacy between Riyadh, Moscow and Washington.

One key issue is to determine the level at which any proposed oil production cuts would begin. Saudi Arabia has ramped up output to record levels in recent weeks.

After a meeting on Friday between President Vladimir Putin and Russian oil executives, Saudi Arabia was accused of having reneged on the previous OPEC+ agreement, and starting the price war that has destabilized global oil markets.

The accusation prompted a hard-hitting response from the Kingdom, with both Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan and Energy Minister Prince Abdul Aziz bin Salman describing the Russian comments as “utterly devoid of truth.”

Behind the spat, there are serious challenges if OPEC+ is to make any progress toward the cuts of up to 15 million barrels per day “expected” by US President Donald Trump.

Despite their differences, both Saudi Arabia and Russia would be unlikely to take on the full burden of cuts without matching reductions by the US. That prospect receded after a meeting between oil industry executives in the White House at which Trump said he would leave the US oil industry to “the free market.”

Free market economics will be on show in the Kingdom on Sunday when Saudi Aramco discloses the price it will charge customers for oil in May. Last month it offered deep discounts to market prices. Demand has fallen substantially since then — down 30 percent according to some oil economists — so further discounts can be expected.


Saudi Arabia strengthens position as world’s largest Islamic finance market

Updated 14 min 36 sec ago

Saudi Arabia strengthens position as world’s largest Islamic finance market

  • Moody’s anticipates a shift to more Shariah-compliant finance over the next 12-18 months as corporates and households increasingly use Islamic products
  • VP-Senior Analyst at Moody’s Ashraf Madani: A comprehensive set of Islamic finance regulations have spurred Saudi banks to issue sukuk

LONDON: Islamic financing in Saudi Arabia will reach around 80 percent of system-wide loans in the next 12-18 months according to a report from Moody’s.
That compares to 78 percent of loans in the Kingdom in 2019 and 70 percent in 2013, the credit ratings agency said in a report on Tuesday.
Moody’s anticipates a shift to more Shariah-compliant finance over the next 12-18 months as corporates and households increasingly use Islamic products, even as low oil prices and the coronavirus crisis cause economic challenges.
Saudi Arabia had total Islamic finance assets of $339 billion as of March 2020, leaving Malaysia in a distant second  place with $145 billion.
“A comprehensive set of Islamic finance regulations have spurred Saudi banks to issue sukuk, Islamic products are now listed on the main market, and an Islamic mortgage refinancing businesshas been established,” said Ashraf Madani, VP-Senior Analyst at Moody’s.
The industry will further benefit from increased government sukuk issuance, potentially rising foreign investment supported by more lenient entry rules and deepening capital markets, Moody’s said.
A wave of mergers and acquisitions across the region is also accelerating the penetration of Islamic finance.