Angola cuts oil shipments to China as it pushes for debt relief

Angola cuts oil shipments to China as it pushes for debt relief
Angola oil industry concept illustration. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 06 June 2020

Angola cuts oil shipments to China as it pushes for debt relief

Angola cuts oil shipments to China as it pushes for debt relief
  • Angola has over $20 billion in bilateral debt with the lion’s share owed to China

LUANDA: Angola has cut the number of oil cargoes that it will ship to Chinese state firms to pay down debt to Beijing as it seeks to renegotiate repayment terms to deal with the pandemic fallout, three sources familiar with the matter said.

Angola said this week it had asked for G20 debt relief and was in advanced talks with some countries importing its oil on adjusting financing facilities, but expects no further debt overhaul to be needed beyond this.

The global economic slowdown due to the coronavirus pandemic pushed Brent oil prices to their lowest levels since the late 1990s and US oil futures to negative territory for the first time in history.

The price drop has put heavily-indebted Angola into a fragile state as it derives a third of state revenues from oil.

By far, its biggest creditor is China. Analysts say Angola has over $20 billion in bilateral debt with the lion’s share owed to China. Much of the cash was borrowed to build roads, hospitals, houses and railways across the African country.

On top of its Chinese debt, Luanda secured a $3.7 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund last year and state oil firm Sonangol has borrowed $2.5 billion from banks between end-2018 and mid-2019, the IMF said.

A global oil output cut deal led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has added to Luanda’s woes.

As an OPEC member, Angola was pressured to cut oil exports starting from May. The result has left the country with fewer and lower-value cargoes to split between paying off its Chinese debt and filling its depleted coffers.

The sources said that China’s state-owned Sinochem will receive five cargoes in July, down from the usual seven or eight, while the trading arm of Chinese giant Sinopec, called Unipec, will receive none. Unipec typically receives two to three cargoes earmarked as debt repayment.

Sonangol, Angola’s finance ministry, Sinopec and Sinochem did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

China’s foreign ministry said on Wednesday that the relevant departments were in contact with Angola over its request.

“These oil-backed loans create stronger interdependence (between lender and borrower) than traditional financing. This tactic of diverting cargoes is not new as seen elsewhere,” David Mihalyi, a senior economic analyst with the Natural Resource Governance Institute, said.

Angola is not the only African country heavily indebted to China. The IMF and ratings agency Moody’s have raised concerns about debt levels in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly with China.