Saudi insurers surge as vehicle checks enforced

Vehicles involved in any traffic violation in Saudi Arabia are automatically checked for insurance. (AFP)
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Updated 09 July 2020

Saudi insurers surge as vehicle checks enforced

  • Move comes as relief to industry still reeling from pandemic fallout

RIYADH: Saudi insurance stocks surged on Wednesday after the traffic department said that it would enforce vehicle checks to ensure drivers had appropriate cover.

The move sent the share prices of several insurers soaring as investors bet they would benefit, as more people would subsequently be forced to buy policies.

Under the current rules, if a vehicle is involved in any traffic violation in the Kingdom, its record is automatically checked to see if there is an insurance policy linked to it.

The top five gainers on the Tadawul were all insurance firms, led by Axa, Walaa and Malath, all up by almost 10 percent on the day.

The insurance sector is one of the most represented on the Tadawul with 32 companies listed. It is also heavily exposed to the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

The pandemic has heaped pressure on regional insurers with S&P warning in April that a spike in claims and a decline in equity markets could hurt their balance sheets.

Aljazira Capital CEO Walid bin Ghaith told Al Araibya that the new decision would be a major boost for the car insurance market in the Kingdom.

“As it is known, the insurance (of cars) is mandatory legally, but there is no mechanism to mandate all people to insure their cars,” he said. “This damaged the insurance companies, since a lot of cars are not insured, so disputes emerge when identifying the liable side in the incident. This will result in two things: First, improving the rate of claims on the insurance companies, and the second, and the more important, is opening a big market or doubling the market for the car insurance companies.”

The move will be welcome news for the auto insurance sector in Saudi Arabia, as car sales worldwide come under increased pressure as people, fearful for their job security, delay major purchasing decisions.


Turkey on brink of recession as economy collapses

Updated 13 August 2020

Turkey on brink of recession as economy collapses

  • Consumer debt has increased by 25 percent to more than $100 billion in the past three months

JEDDAH: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s popularity is plunging in lockstep with Turkey’s collapsing economy and the country is on the verge of a potentially devastating recession, financial experts have told Arab News.
The value of the Turkish lira has fallen to 7.30 against the US dollar and the central bank has spent $65 billion to prop up the currency, according to the US investment bank Goldman Sachs.
Consumer debt has increased by 25 percent to more than $100 billion in the past three months as the government moved to help families during the coronavirus pandemic, but the result has been a surge in inflation to 12 percent.
With the falling lira and increased price of imported goods, the living standards of many Turks who earn in lira but have dollar debts have fallen sharply.
The economy is expected to shrink by about 4 percent this year. The official unemployment rate remains at 12.8 percent because layoffs are banned, although many experts say the real figures are far higher.
To complete the perfect storm, tourism revenues and exports have been decimated by the pandemic, and foreign capital has fled amid fears over economic trends and the independence of the central bank.
Wolfango Piccoli, of Teneo Intelligence in London, said logic dictated an increase in interest rates but “this is unlikely to happen.”
Piccoli said central bank officials would strive to avoid an outright rate hike at their monetary policy meeting on Aug. 20. “A mix of controlled devaluation and backdoor policies, such as limiting Turkish lira’s liquidity, remains their preferred approach,” he said.
There is speculation of snap elections, and Erdogan’s view is that higher interest rates cause inflation, despite considerable economic evidence to the contrary.