UAE central bank further eases liquidity measures for lenders

The UAE government in March launched the $69.707 million Targeted Economic Support Scheme to help companies and individuals affected by the coronavirus pandemic. (AFP)
Short Url
Updated 09 August 2020

UAE central bank further eases liquidity measures for lenders

DUBAI: UAE monetary authorities further eased liquidity measures for the country’s banks, enabling them to free up more cash to lend to companies and individuals affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

The UAE government in March launched the $69.707 billion Targeted Economic Support Scheme (TESS), which includes $13.615 billion provided by the central bank via collateralized loans at zero cost to all banks operating in the country.

Monetary authorities are “reviewing the existing thresholds of two prudential ratios: the Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR) and the Advances to Stable Resources Ratio (ASRR) by temporarily relaxing the requirements for the structural liquidity position of banks,” a statement from the UAE Central Bank said, as reported by state news agency WAM.

“This step comes as an additional measure encouraging banks to strengthen the implementation of the TESS and support their impacted customers in overcoming the repercussions of COVID-19 pandemic, the statement added.

For the NSFR, mandatory for the five largest UAE banks, lenders were allowed to go below the 100 percent threshold, but not lower than 90 percent, while ASRRs could go beyond 100 percent but not higher than 110 percent.

The purposal of these ratios is to ensure that long-term assets are funded by stable resources of funding, and their relaxation means banks will have more flexibility in managing their balance sheets.

“The relaxation of the two structural liquidity ratios aims to further facilitate the flow of funds from banks into the economy,” UAE central bank governor Abdulhamid M. Saeed said.

“The temporary relaxation of NSFR and ASRR will supplement the other measures CBUAE has taken under the TESS to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on private corporates, small and medium-sized enterprises and individuals.”

UAE banks have accessed about 87.2 percent – or $11.872 billion – of the Dh50 billion TESS support provided by the central bank as of July while 9,527 small and medium enterprises and more than 260,600 individuals have benefited from the scheme.


Alvarez & Marsal named administrators of UAE’s NMC Healthcare

Updated 25 min 29 sec ago

Alvarez & Marsal named administrators of UAE’s NMC Healthcare

DUBAI: Restructuring consultancy Alvarez & Marsal said on Sunday it had been appointed as administrator of a group of operating businesses related to NMC Healthcare by the Abu Dhabi Global Market Courts.

Richard Fleming and Ben Cairns of Alvarez & Marsal have been appointed as joint administrators, the firm said in an emailed statement, adding the administration process would address the “high levels of debt in the businesses.”

NMC Healthcare’s London-listed holding company NMC Health Plc is already being run by Alvarez & Marsal after going into administration in April following months of turmoil over its finances.

The turnaround specialist said on Sunday the appointment related directly to 36 operating businesses in the United Arab Emirates, but did not apply to businesses outside the country.

The appointment “will also allow the group of entities to secure an additional $325 million financing facility whilst protecting the businesses from creditor action,” Alvarez & Marsal said.

The administrators would lead the financial restructuring of those businesses while the existing NMC management team remained in operational control of the day-to-day running of medical and clinical activities, it said.

NMC Health is the largest private health care provider in the UAE, operating more than 200 facilities including hospitals, clinics and pharmacies.

Its implosion this year amid allegations of fraud and the disclosure of more than $4 billion in hidden debt has left some UAE and overseas lenders with heavy losses and prompted legal battles to try and recover money owed.