Equities eye third week of gains after tech boost, S&P 500 hits new record

Equities eye third week of gains after tech boost, S&P 500 hits new record
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Updated 22 October 2021

Equities eye third week of gains after tech boost, S&P 500 hits new record

Equities eye third week of gains after tech boost, S&P 500 hits new record

Global shares were on course for their third straight week of gains on Friday, buoyed by tech stocks in Asia overnight, while the dollar dipped and oil prices held steady.


MSCI's broadest gauge of global shares was up 0.1 percent in early European trade, 1.4 percent higher on the week and just 0.8 percent off its all-time high.

Germany's DAX gained 0.4 percent to 15,535.16. In Paris, the CAC 40 jumped 1.1 percent to 6,759.46, while Britain's FTSE 100 added 0.4 percent to 7,220.57.

The future for the S&P 500 was nearly unchanged while the future for the Dow industrials gained less than 0.1 percent.


On Thursday, the S&P 500 rose 0.3 percent to 4,549.78, its seventh straight gain. That eclipsed the record high it set on Sept. 2. 


That followed gains in Asia, where equity bulls were also comforted by news that heavily indebted Chinese property firm China Evergrande Group had made a surprise interest payment, averting a default for now.


Japan's Nikkei advanced 0.3 percent, led by the technology sector, while energy and basic materials shares were the biggest drags as coal futures extended their losses after Beijing signalled it would intervene to cool surging prices that contributed to the country's electricity shortage.


More broadly, investors have become increasingly concerned that persistent inflation could force central bankers to tighten monetary policy at a point where global economic growth remains fragile.


Mark Haefele, Chief Investment Officer, UBS Global Wealth Management, said in a note to clients that equities could still move higher, despite growing concerns around the impact of inflation and the potential for central banks to tighten policy.


"With current issues still appearing more temporary than structural, we believe equity markets will continue to move higher," Haefele said.


"Indeed, small increases in inflation expectations can be positive for markets if it helps to banish fears of deflation. Furthermore, by our assessment, global growth remains strong, supply chain challenges should recede into 2022, and corporate earnings should continue to grow."


U.S. stock futures point to a 0.1 percent lower open, after the cash index posted a record closing high overnight, led by surging tech shares.


Next week, Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google-owner Alphabet all report, with bulls hoping they can follow forecast-beating earnings this week from Netflix.


Meanwhile, yields on benchmark 10-year Treasury notes were at 1.6828 percent, easing back from a five-month high of 1.7050 percent reached overnight.


The dollar index, which gauges the greenback against six major rivals, was down 0.1 percent to 93.639 on Friday, despite initially bouncing off recent lows after U.S. jobless claims fell to a 19-month low, pointing to a tighter labor market.


The Fed has signalled it could start to taper stimulus as soon as next month, with rate hikes to follow late next year. Full employment is among the Fed's stated requirements for rates lift-off.


Fed Chair Jerome Powell speaks later on Friday in a panel discussion.


Across commodities, oil was flat with Brent crude set for its first losing week in seven and West Texas Intermediate its first in nine.


Gold was up 0.5 percent on the back of the weaker dollar, on course for its second week of gains.


Bitcoin continues to decline from its high in November: Crypto wrap

Bitcoin continues to decline from its high in November: Crypto wrap
Updated 10 sec ago

Bitcoin continues to decline from its high in November: Crypto wrap

Bitcoin continues to decline from its high in November: Crypto wrap

RIYADH: Bitcoin, the leading cryptocurrency, plunged around 30 percent from the year’s high of $69,000 on Nov. 10.

It, however, traded higher on Sunday, rising by 2.82 percent to $48,972 at 5:14 p.m. Riyadh time.

Ether, the second most popular cryptocurrency, traded at $4,140 up 4.16 percent, according to data from CoinDesk.

“Corrections and declines do occur in almost all markets including crypto. The current decline is considered the largest in terms of market value since the late March 2020 decline,” Abdullah Mashat, managing director of a private Saudi retail company told Arab News.

Mashat said: “Current decline is due to investors being concerned of tapering talks in the US, which resulted in the decline in stock exchanges and later this caused liquidity crunch in the crypto markets."

Anto Paroian, COO at crypto hedge fund ARK36 said: “The market sentiments  have decisively soured as a result of deepening concerns about omicron variant and its (likely) effect on the economy. The current situation resembles closely what happened in March 2020 as we’re seeing equities plunge 5 percent off recent highs and the negativity is spreading to other markets as well including the digital asset markets. 

“On the other hand, the current price levels aren’t unexpected after the bulls failed to flip the $60,000 resistance multiple times in the past few weeks. During previous Bitcoin bull markets violent swings of 20-30 percent happened a few times before the market topped and let’s remember what happened in July - and how well the market rebounded afterward."

 "It must be noted, though, that one of the key Bitcoin bull market indicators — the 20-week simple moving average — has now been decisively breached so the outlook is currently bearish in the short to medium term. What’s more, since there are widespread expectations that interest rates will rise as central banks are signaling a more aggressive stance on inflation, the violent price move in the digital asset market may also suggest that some investors are preparing to go into a risk-off mode for the time being," Paroian added.

Meanwhile, El Salvador President Nayib Bukele said the Central American country had acquired an additional 150 bitcoins after the digital currency’s value slumped again, enlarging his bet on the cryptocurrency despite criticism.

Bukele said last week that El Salvador had acquired 100 additional coins to take advantage of the currency weakening.


Aramco enters Saudi lubricants market with new product line

Aramco enters Saudi lubricants market with new product line
Updated 21 min 47 sec ago

Aramco enters Saudi lubricants market with new product line

Aramco enters Saudi lubricants market with new product line

RIYADH: Saudi Aramco on Sunday announced its entry into the Kingdom’s domestic lubricants market with the launch of a new line of products.

The oil giant timed the ORIZON® launch to coincide with the inaugural Saudi Arabian Formula 1 Grand Prix in Jeddah.

The product line has been introduced in more than 20 cities including Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam with more locations planned. The products include synthetic and semisynthetic lubricants for gasoline engines and heavy-duty diesel engines, as well as driveline products, greases and brake fluids. 

The company has also expanded the brand to include ORIZONPRO® which is a high-performance line for the industrial sector.

Yasser M. Mufti, Aramco vice president of fuels, said: “Entering the lubricants market is an important milestone for the company, as we continue to expand our presence throughout the downstream value chain.” 

The launch “further complements Aramco’s presence in the Kingdom’s downstream direct-to-consumer segment, following the inauguration of our first two service stations in Riyadh and Saihat recently.”


Countries tackle economic woes amid omicron fears, revised growth outlooks: Economic wrap

Countries tackle economic woes amid omicron fears, revised growth outlooks: Economic wrap
Updated 29 min 31 sec ago

Countries tackle economic woes amid omicron fears, revised growth outlooks: Economic wrap

Countries tackle economic woes amid omicron fears, revised growth outlooks: Economic wrap

CAIRO: The Australian government is expected to raise its economic growth forecast for 2022 in its midyear budget review, according to the country’s treasurer, Josh Frydenberg.

He said omicron’s effect, the new COVID-19 variant, is still unclear.

The country’s fiscal year runs until June.

The Australian economy narrowed by 1.9 percent in the third quarter of this year on the back of the delta variant which led to a national lockdown.

However, the treasurer said the country now enjoys one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, boosting market conditions.

France avoids more restrictions

France will try to refrain from the imposition of any health-related restrictions even as virus cases continue to rise, the country’s Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said.

France is also avoiding any mandatory vaccination campaigns, Bloomberg reported, citing the minister.

He said two sectors, restaurants and hospitality, were particularly hit by the wave of new cases, adding that they will receive government support.

He also stated the new variant, omicron, is yet to have an effect on the country’s economic growth.

US growth rate

Unlike other countries, US expected growth rates for both 2021 and next year were trimmed down by Goldman Sachs, one of the world’s leading investment banks. 

It said this downward revision was attributed to a potential adverse effect by omicron, according to Bloomberg.

The world’s largest economy is now predicted to grow by 3.8 percent in 2021, instead of the previous 4.2 percent forecast. As for next year, the US is set to expand by 2.9 percent, down from 3.3 percent.

Meanwhile, the country’s unemployment rate plunged to a 21-month low to hit 4.2 percent in November, according to the Labor Department. This is a 2.1 percent drop compared to January’s level, a considerable decline.

However, employment growth slowed down during the month.

The economy is still expected to experience strong growth in the fourth quarter, following the previous quarter’s weak performance.


ENGIE pulls out of a $3bn Qatar project amid global supply chain disruptions: Al Arabiya

ENGIE pulls out of a $3bn Qatar project amid global supply chain disruptions: Al Arabiya
Updated 05 December 2021

ENGIE pulls out of a $3bn Qatar project amid global supply chain disruptions: Al Arabiya

ENGIE pulls out of a $3bn Qatar project amid global supply chain disruptions: Al Arabiya

A coalition led by the French power utility company ENGIE has withdrawn from competing for a $3 billion Qatari project that aims to build a power and water desalination plant.

This happens as uncertainty about the prices of future projects lingers amid the disruption of global supply chains, Al Arabiya reported citing sources. 

The withdrawal came as investment feasibility was lower than the original plan and the responsible party’s refusal to amend the terms of the contract, the report said.

Sources added the withdrawal means the Japanese investment company Marubeni alliance has won the project.

Qatar’s new project aims to produce electricity from gas with a capacity of 2.5 GW and desalinate over 100 million gallons of water per day.

 


Saudi Arabia raises January Arab Light crude prices to Asia

Saudi Arabia raises January Arab Light crude prices to Asia
Image: Shutterstock
Updated 05 December 2021

Saudi Arabia raises January Arab Light crude prices to Asia

Saudi Arabia raises January Arab Light crude prices to Asia

Saudi Arabia's state oil producer Aramco raised its January official selling price to Asia for its flagship Arab Light crude to $3.30 a barrel versus Oman/Dubai crude, up $0.60 from December, the company said on Sunday.

The company set the Arab Light OSP to Northwestern Europe at minus $1.30 per barrel versus ICE Brent and to the United States at plus $2.15 per barrel over ASCI (Argus Sour Crude Index).