What We Are Reading Today: Adriatic

What We Are Reading Today: Adriatic
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Updated 23 April 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Adriatic

What We Are Reading Today: Adriatic

Robert D. Kaplan’s outstanding new book is about reflection, introspection, geopolitics, geography, culture, history, religion, civilization and travel in “the globe in miniature.”
In this insightful travelogue, Kaplan, geopolitical expert and bestselling author of Balkan Ghosts and The Revenge of Geography, turns his perceptive eye to a region that for centuries has been a meeting point of cultures, trade, and ideas.
He undertakes a journey around the Adriatic Sea, through Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Montenegro, Albania, and Greece, to reveal that far more is happening in the region than most news stories let on.
Often overlooked, the Adriatic is in fact at the center of the most significant challenges of our time, including the rise of populist politics, the refugee crisis, and battles over the control of energy resources.
Kaplan explores how the region has changed over his three decades of observing it as a journalist.
Kaplan “is a gem of a writer and his descriptions are vivid, original and lovely,” said a review on goodreads.com.
“Kaplan’s writing is comprehensive yet accessible, bursting at the seams with information.”


What We Are Reading Today: Translating Myself and Others

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Updated 22 May 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Translating Myself and Others

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Author: Jhumpa Lahiri

Translating Myself and Others is a collection of candid and disarmingly personal essays by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jhumpa Lahiri, who reflects on her emerging identity as a translator as well as a writer in two languages.
With subtlety and emotional immediacy, Lahiri draws on Ovid’s myth of Echo and Narcissus to explore the distinction between writing and translating, and provides a close reading of passages from Aristotle’s Poetics to talk more broadly about writing, desire, and freedom.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Indelible City

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Updated 21 May 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Indelible City

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Author: Louisa Lim

Louisa Lim’s Indelible City dismantles the received wisdom about Hong Kong’s history and replaces it with an engaging, exhaustively researched account of its long struggle for sovereignty.
“Definitely recommended for anyone wishing to better know this unique city and its people,” said a review on Goodreads.com.
It said that Lim’s “deeply researched and personal account is startling, casting new light on key moments: The British takeover in 1842, the negotiations over the 1997 return to China, and the future Beijing seeks to impose.”
Indelible City features guerrilla calligraphers, amateur historians and archaeologists who, like Lim, aim to put Hong Kongers at the center of their own story.
The review added: “Wending through it all is the King of Kowloon, whose iconic street art both embodied and inspired the identity of Hong Kong — a site of disappearance and reappearance, power and powerlessness, loss and reclamation.”
The author does an amazing job explaining the past and present.

She gives readers true insight into the people of Hong Kong and its true history.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Novel Relations by Alicia Mireles Christoff

What We Are Reading Today: Novel Relations by Alicia Mireles Christoff
Updated 19 May 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Novel Relations by Alicia Mireles Christoff

What We Are Reading Today: Novel Relations by Alicia Mireles Christoff

Novel Relations engages 20th-century post-Freudian British psychoanalysis in an unprecedented way: As literary theory. Placing the writing of figures like D. W. Winnicott, W. R. Bion, Michael and Enid Balint, Joan Riviere, Paula Heimann, and Betty Joseph in conversation with canonical Victorian fiction, Alicia Christoff reveals just how much object relations can teach us about how and why we read.

These thinkers illustrate the ever-shifting impact our relations with others have on the psyche, and help us see how literary figures—characters, narrators, authors, and other readers—shape and structure us too. For Christoff, novels are charged relational fields.


What We Are Reading Today: The Tower and the Bridge

What We Are Reading Today: The Tower and the Bridge
Updated 19 May 2022

What We Are Reading Today: The Tower and the Bridge

What We Are Reading Today: The Tower and the Bridge

Author: David P. Billington

What do structures such as the Eiffel Tower, the Brooklyn Bridge, and the concrete roofs of Pier Luigi Nervi have in common? According to The Tower and the Bridge, all are striking examples of structural art, an exciting area distinct from either architecture or machine design.

Aided by stunning photographs, David Billington discusses the technical concerns and artistic principles underpinning the well-known projects of leading structural engineer-artists, including Othmar Ammann, Félix Candela, Gustave Eiffel, Fazlur Khan, Robert Maillart, John Roebling, and many others.

A classic work, The Tower and the Bridge introduces readers to the fundamental aesthetics of engineering.
 


What We Are Reading Today: Restoring the Global Judiciary

What We Are Reading Today: Restoring the Global Judiciary
Updated 17 May 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Restoring the Global Judiciary

What We Are Reading Today: Restoring the Global Judiciary

Author: Martin S. Flaherty

In the past several decades, there has been a growing chorus of voices contending that the Supreme Court and federal judiciary should stay out of foreign affairs and leave the field to Congress and the president.

Challenging this idea, Restoring the Global Judiciary argues instead for a robust judicial role in the conduct of US foreign policy.

With an innovative combination of constitutional history, international relations theory, and legal doctrine, Martin Flaherty demonstrates that the Supreme Court and federal judiciary have the power and duty to apply the law without deference to the other branches.