Christie’s to auction Arab artworks in London

Christie’s to auction Arab artworks in London
Basel Dalloul. (Supplied)
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Updated 21 October 2023
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Christie’s to auction Arab artworks in London

Christie’s to auction Arab artworks in London

DUBAI: British auction house Christie’s is set to sell 48 Arab artworks from the Dalloul art collection in London.

The sale, titled “Marhala: Highlights from the Dalloul Collection,” will take place on Nov. 9 at Christie’s headquarters.




Mahmoud Saïd's, Fille à l'imprimé. (Supplied)

The event will represent an immersive journey through modern and contemporary Arab art history from the 1930s up until the 2010s.

Formed by the late visionary art collector Ramzi Dalloul and his wife, Saeda El-Husseini, and advanced by their son, Basel Dalloul, the collection is located in Beirut.

Their decades of travel throughout the Arab region combined with their deep relationships with artists, have shaped a collection that celebrates Arab artistic diversity and culture.


Al-Majaridah Winter Festival draws 30,000 visitors

Al-Majaridah Winter Festival draws 30,000 visitors
Updated 11 December 2023
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Al-Majaridah Winter Festival draws 30,000 visitors

Al-Majaridah Winter Festival draws 30,000 visitors
  • Festival’s recreational activities include theatrical shows and competitions for children, with folk groups presenting popular shows, such as the Ardah dance
  • A honey festival was held in the exhibition hall on Art Street, in which 41 exhibitors, including beekeepers and honey producers, took part

RIYADH: The Al-Majaridah Winter tourism festival has attracted more than 30,000 people since launching two weeks ago.

The organizers said diverse activities are being held near Art Street in the center of the Al-Majaridah Governorate in the Asir region, such as shopping and entertainment, providing dozens of seasonal jobs for young men and women.

Citizens and visitors are visiting the festival’s shopping hall where household items, clothes, perfumes, sweets and other products are displayed.

The festival’s recreational activities include theatrical shows and competitions for children, with folk groups presenting popular shows, such as the Ardah dance. The festival also incorporates an amusement city with a range of games.

A honey festival was held in the exhibition hall on Art Street, in which 41 exhibitors, including beekeepers and honey producers, took part.

Several government authorities also took part in the event, in addition to farmers and producing families.

The festival showcased some of the most popular types of honey, such as sidr, sumra, shouka, Al-Majarah and Al-Dhahyan, as well as honey products, and beekeeping tools and wax.

The Al-Majaridah Governorate is a prominent winter tourist destination, attracting people seeking a warm climate and breathtaking nature.


Netflix film ‘Naga’ is a universal tale, says award-winning star Adwa Bader

Netflix film ‘Naga’ is a universal tale, says award-winning star Adwa Bader
Updated 11 December 2023
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Netflix film ‘Naga’ is a universal tale, says award-winning star Adwa Bader

Netflix film ‘Naga’ is a universal tale, says award-winning star Adwa Bader

JEDDAH: Netflix movie “Naga” blends tradition, bravery and vulnerability in a unique narrative — and its lead star, Saudi actress Adwa Bader, spoke to Arab News about why it is a “universal tale.” 

Directed by Meshal Aljaser, the film follows Sarah (Bader), who sneaks out on a date and hopes to return before her curfew. What begins as a quiet drive in the desert soon spirals into an adventure involving an underground party, a broken-down car and a vindictive camel. With nothing to rely on but her wits, she must escape a series of bizarre situations to meet her father before the clock strikes 10.

The Netflix Original production premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival and screened at the recent Red Sea International Film Festival in Jeddah before it hit Netflix on Dec. 7. 

Bader shared insights on her preparation for the role, saying: “Meshal and I rehearsed a lot, going over the script and merging our perspectives on Sarah. It was a collaborative effort.” 

The actress added audience reaction so far had been gratifying. 

“What was so rewarding about Sarah was seeing how people relate to the story, because it’s such a universal tale. It’s just a day that turned really bad. I understand her, I have so much love for her. I wish her well. I feel we can all relate to the feminine rage to an extent,” she said. 

A poster for Netflix film 'Naga.' (Supplied)

The protagonist’s character arc is another element that drew the actress to the role, which landed her a spot in the TIFF 2023 Rising Stars program for outstanding lead performance. She also scored the TIFF Share Her Journey fellowship and award.

“I think what’s really interesting is that she’s a product of her environment. She was really passive in the beginning and her environment forced her to react and respond and really express herself. I think Meshal’s perspective is that Sarah is an independent, strong-willed and resilient character and I agree with that,” Bader said. 

Meanwhile, Aljaser told Arab News it was a conscious decision to create an off-kilter film. 

“You don’t have to see a reference of success and think that is the only way to succeed — you can succeed in so many different styles,” he said. 


Saudi Music Commission CEO sets sights on education sector at XP Music Futures

Saudi Music Commission CEO sets sights on education sector at XP Music Futures
Updated 10 December 2023
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Saudi Music Commission CEO sets sights on education sector at XP Music Futures

Saudi Music Commission CEO sets sights on education sector at XP Music Futures

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Music Commission is aiming to see 1.3 million Saudi students enrolled in music classes at school, the CEO of the Music Commission Paul Pacifico said at an XP Music Futures panel in Riyadh tilted “Sound Governance: Crafting the Future of Music Policy.”

Pacifico said that 26,500 kindergarten teachers are being trained to teach music and “music is going into school as a compulsory subject” for kindergarten, elementary, and middle school students in the Kingdom. 

He added: “1.3 million Saudis will be doing music school for the first time. And we'll be developing that program up through middle school. It'll be elective in high school. We're working with the first four universities in the Kingdom to build lots of faculties and support music programs.” 

The panel discussion featured industry professionals Lutz Leichsenring, co-founder of Vibelab, and Mai Salama, founding partner of Creative Industry Summit. It was moderated by Jake Beaumont-Nesbitt, director of innovation and education at the International Music Managers Forum.

Pacifico says the Music Commission has three main objectives: Music policy, education, and the commercial sector.

“(Firstly) The development of copyrights, intellectual property, licensing, recreation, all the aspects you think of when you think of government. Secondary is education. So, we are responsible for taking the lead on the education strategy for the Kingdom … (for) the entire commercial sector. We're responsible for supporting the development of the live music sector, recording and publishing.” 

He told Arab News that the commission aims to support non-mainstream music genres through programs and festivals like the International Jazz Festival in Saudi Arabia.

“The thing is to not treat these genres in silos, to look at them as an intersecting creative community. How do we support the community and how do we let the grassroots tell us what music is needed? … it's about fostering creativity and enabling a young population,” he said.


Nicolas Cage shares career insights and teases ‘Dream Scenario’ at RSIFF

Nicolas Cage shares career insights and teases ‘Dream Scenario’ at RSIFF
Updated 09 December 2023
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Nicolas Cage shares career insights and teases ‘Dream Scenario’ at RSIFF

Nicolas Cage shares career insights and teases ‘Dream Scenario’ at RSIFF

JEDDAH: During an “In Conversation” panel at Jeddah’s Red Sea International Film Festival, Oscar-winning actor Nicolas Cage captivated the audience in an hour-long discussion on his notable performances.

Moderated by Lebanese presenter Raya Abirached, the event saw Cage start off by sharing the story of his name change from Nicolas Coppola to Nicolas Cage at the beginning of his career.

He recounted instances of on-set bullying during the filming of “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” where his talent was called into doubt due to his relation to renowned filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola.

 

 

Cage disclosed: “They would quote lines from ‘Apocalypse Now’ and change them to ‘I love the smell of Nicolas in the mornings’ instead of ‘napalm in the morning.’”

He acknowledged how directors and filmmakers might not want the name Coppola associated with their work, which led him to change his name. Cage explained: “I didn’t think any filmmaker in their own right would want the name Coppola above the title of their movie. So, I changed my name predominantly for business reasons.”

Reflecting on his role in the 1987 comedy film “Moonstruck” alongside Cher, Cage shared an amusing conversation in which he asked the singer why she wanted him in the movie. Cage recalled her response: “‘I saw you in ‘Peggy Sue Got Married’ and thought it was like a two-hour car accident, and I had to have you.’”

 

 

Cage evaluated his past works with enthusiasm, naming “Vampire’s Kiss,” “Leaving Las Vegas,” “Raising Arizona,” “Adaptation,” and the highly anticipated A24 production “Dream Scenario” as the five scripts he considers to be the pinnacle of his 45-year journey in the industry.

Providing a glimpse into his future endeavors, Cage unveiled details about his upcoming film “Dream Scenario,” where he will portray an ordinary man who mysteriously starts appearing in the dreams of others.

Cage also expressed his interest in exploring television and said: “I’m thinking about television. My son turned me on to ‘Breaking Bad,’ and I saw Bryan Cranston stare at a suitcase for one hour. I never get time to stare at a suitcase for an hour. I said, ‘Let’s do some TV.’”

He revealed his intention to transition to television while maintaining a selective approach to film projects, citing his desire to spend more time with his 15-month-old daughter as a motivating factor.

Cage also discussed the impact of winning the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in Mike Figgis’ “Leaving Las Vegas” in 1995. He credited the award for providing him with creative freedom and the opportunity to pursue his artistic vision. Cage joked that the award gave him a “tenure” to make movies, allowing him to work with directors while still retaining creative control.

During the conversation, Cage revealed a fascinating tidbit about almost starring in a “Superman” film directed by Tim Burton.

However, this exciting project was ultimately shelved due to the apprehension of studio executives. Cage explained: “Tim was riding high after the success of ‘Mars Attacks!’ Initially, they considered Renny Harlin to direct, but I knew that playing such an iconic role required hitting the bull’s eye. We came incredibly close, but the studio made the decision to cancel the entire production. I believe they were concerned about the potential cost and whether they would recoup their investment.”


Egyptian actress Amira Adeeb nabs Hollywood breakout role in Jeffrey Elmont’s ‘No Nation’

Egyptian actress Amira Adeeb nabs Hollywood breakout role in Jeffrey Elmont’s ‘No Nation’
Updated 09 December 2023
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Egyptian actress Amira Adeeb nabs Hollywood breakout role in Jeffrey Elmont’s ‘No Nation’

Egyptian actress Amira Adeeb nabs Hollywood breakout role in Jeffrey Elmont’s ‘No Nation’

DUBAI: Egyptian actress Amira Adeeb announced this week that she is set to star in the upcoming Hollywood film “No Nation,” directed by Jeffrey Elmont. 

The actress, who has starred in Egyptian TV hits such as “Naql Aam” and “Meet Gal?!,” took to Instagram to share the news with her followers. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Amira Adeeb (@amiraadeebb)

 

“I’ve been sitting on this for six months and not a single person had a clue, not even my parents. I think I’m more proud of my big mouth for keeping this a secret than anything,” she wrote to her 1 million Instagram followers. 

“So much to say and so many feelings to be felt but I’ll wait a bit and more details to come,” she teased.  

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Amira Adeeb (@amiraadeebb)

 

The actress also thanked Elmont for believing in her and for “casting an Arab girl in a non-Arab-cliché role.” She added: “Working with you has been a blessing.”