Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee

Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee
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Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
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Updated 02 January 2024
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Bohemia Cafe is where Alkhobar musicians rock, sip coffee

Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)
  • Bohemia provides us with live music, unlike other coffee shops, says local artist

ALKHOBAR: The new Bohemia Cafe is unlike any other in the area. It looks like you just pulled up to your cool friend’s house, with a small, serene garden path that leads to a well-curated space, ready to whisk you in, to have a fresh cup of strong coffee as music plays in the background.

Opened in early 2023, this iteration is a more cozy and grown-up version of the original Bohemia Cafe.

The first branch, which opened in 2018, was situated in a bustling part of the city and had an earthy vibe with a tinge of fun and funky. But the all-glass space, facing traffic in a commercial building, was plagued by limited parking spaces and did not fully fit the Bohemian energy.




The hybrid cafe, which is one of the singular places to buy and sell vinyl records in the area. (AN photos)

When the old space shuttered, the music scene in Alkhobar lost a communal hub in which sonic synergies merged.

But with this new location, in the sleepy historic northern Alkhobar area, it seemed more their speed. It has stayed close to its roots in Alkhobar but evolved into being a quaint, house-type standalone, where there is a sizable front yard and plenty of seating indoors and out.

The hybrid cafe, which is one of the singular places to buy and sell vinyl records in the area, has become a sort of off-the-beaten-path sanctuary where the artsy types in the area can come together to enjoy music while sipping on one of the cafe’s beverages, and snacking on the homemade pastries on sale.

HIGHLIGHTS

• It is perhaps one of the few venues that welcome all levels of talent, and certainly one of the rare ones that offer the chance for amateurs to perform.

• Most who come to Bohemia on their live performance nights — which include ones dedicated to certain singers or open mics — can expect the unexpected.

In contrast to the flashy Riyadh and fancy Jeddah venues, especially with the success of music festivals such as XP and MDLBEAST in both cities, quaint Alkhobar has always been more niche, and definitely an off-the-radar city.

The east coast has long enjoyed a culture that is steeped in a more laid-back lifestyle. Bohemia Cafe refers to itself as “an independent music record store and cafe in Alkhobar” but it is more than that. It is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar.




Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)

It is perhaps one of the few venues that welcome all levels of talent, and certainly one of the rare ones that offer the chance for amateurs to perform. Most who come to Bohemia on their live performance nights — which include ones dedicated to certain singers or open mics — can expect the unexpected. Like a mixtape, the night is a mixed bag: some will masterfully play instruments, while others shout out words and move around with a mic in hand. The community seems to transcend time and space.

Before any open mic at Bohemia, a notice is posted days in advance on social media and interested artists can direct-message to sign up. Those who wish to simply sip a beverage and watch need to buy a ticket, usually between SR75 ($20) and SR100. This can be used as credit in the store on the day of the show, to buy music or something else.

Fatima, who identifies as an artist, loves the aesthetic of the cafe but most of all the way local talents are showcased in such a safe and fun environment.




Bohemia Cafe is the heartbeat of local music lovers, and quintessentially Alkhobar. (AN photos)

As the winter nights become long, she relishes spending her evenings in the space, cradling a warm drink and experiencing a sense of wonder. Every time she visits, she is giddy about the prospect of listening to familiar voices and discovering new ones.

“Bohemia has significantly provided us with something that other coffee shops don’t — live music,” Fatima, who has been to several open mics, told Arab News.

“Each live show has its own vibe; the diversity of bands, the chosen genres and targeted audience tells a lot about how much everyone in this place shares one standing thing in common — their passion for music,” she said.

And, indeed, music is what brings — and what keeps — people coming back.

Dana, who goes by the stage name “Farasha” which is Arabic for butterfly, stumbled upon the cafe, serendipitously, on a karaoke night at the old Bohemia. The exhilarating experience helped her spread her wings.

“It happened by mistake. I once attended a karaoke night in either 2021 or 2022 — at the old branch — and I watched people sing karaoke. I did not sign up. And I was like, I want to hold the mic. So I did,” she told Arab News.

Her sisters and friends, who were with her, encouraged her to step up and go for it. She stood up and belted out a popular tune “Hit the road, Jack,” because she knew the band on hand would know how to play it. Many sang along. She had fun. While performing, she said that she channeled her idol, Hannah Montana, a fictional character on a popular Disney show, who is a regular teen but also a huge pop star on the side.

“I want to rock out, too,” Farasha said.

In late November, she performed several songs at the most recent open mic. With a crisp voice and quiet confidence, her hands fluttered gracefully as she hit the notes. And, when she occasionally forgot some of the lyrics, the crowd filled in the blanks and joined her in unison.

“The first time I performed, I was really nervous. My sisters were so encouraging. People were cheering. And then Fawaz, the owner, reached out to me to perform later; I did a quick session at Ladies Night. It was a great experience. So today wasn’t my first time; it was I believe, my third or fourth time,” she said.

She was referring to the ever-present but never overbearing owner Fawaz Alsulaim. If ever a figure encapsulated the essence of the old and new Bohemia Cafes, it is the owner.

Alsulaim, who could be described as a quiet but not shy millennial, often sits calmly, exuding wisdom and, perhaps, inner peace. He is approachable but also elusive. During the aforementioned open mic, he strategically sat in a corner with the best vantage point, throwing reassuring nods to performers but barely going into the spotlight at all. With his calm demeanor and sharp eye — and ear — for talent, he is simply there to spot potential and to foster it.

“We discovered so many talents, so many people who didn’t even consider pursuing music careers or performing — they did their first gig here, either at an open mic or with just an acoustic guitar or even doing it karaoke style,” Alsulaim told Arab News with a smile. “Them getting the rush of performing live — so, so many people started their music careers this way,” he proudly said.

If you want to sing but feel nervous, Alsulaim would be there to offer words of encouragement but never pressure.

Some who choose to go on stage are seasoned professionals, while others had previously only performed with their hairbrushes in their bedrooms.

On the day of our visit, a young woman with a baseball cap and face half-covered in a mask came on stage. She said that it was her first time singing in front of an audience and asked if people would humor her and respectfully not photograph or film her performance. During the entirety of her time on stage, no one held up a phone. Everyone just watched, sang along when she prompted, and clapped for her.

Some performers are armed with original songs, in English or Arabic. What is evident is that it is a place where experimentation is welcome. As long as you have the guts to step up to the mic, people will listen.

On average, about a dozen people sign up to perform, with around half usually first-timers.

“Everyone is always welcome to perform here, whatever they want. If they want to sing, we never turn anyone away,” Alsulaim told Arab News.

Alsulaim was true to his word when Arab News visited. After the final act was announced, people started to leave. But someone casually singled out a person in the front row, who had been nodding and clapping along all night. He gladly went to the stage for a song. Then two, then three. Many who were leaving sat down.

The performer was none other than Nader Al-Fassam, a local legend in the Alkhobar underground since the 1990s, and has been a regular on the scene and at Bohemia specifically. He is at ease singing well-known top-40 hits as well as more obscure favorites. He often performs his own original music.

“I wasn’t supposed to perform tonight but somebody didn’t show up so I was kind of pushed to take his place,” he told Arab News after his set.

A staple at music-focused celebrations in the area, Al-Fassam is perhaps the perfect encapsulation of the old and new Bohemia. He is the lead guitarist with the Saudi Arabia psychedelic punk band, Sound of Ruby. Like Alsulaim, he is eager for the next generation of Eastern Province talents to step up and join the party.

Al-Fassam, before the grand finale of the Open Mic, announced to the crowd that he would celebrate his 50th birthday at Bohemia Cafe — because it hits all the right notes. Alsulaim gracefully nodded and everyone — presumably invited — erupted in wild applause.

Alsulaim’s clear joy derived from finding and celebrating local talent has become an endearing quality in the community.

When asked if he would be singing at the next show, or at Al-Fassam’s birthday party, Alsulaim shook his head playfully.

“I’m not a musician unfortunately, I just sell some music,” he responded.

 

 


Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah

Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah
Updated 14 June 2024
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Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah

Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah
  • 1,000 families of Palestinians killed or wounded in Gaza war also arrived to perform Hajj at the invitation of Saudi King Salman
  • This year’s Hajj saw Syrian pilgrims traveling to Makkah on direct flights from Damascus for the first time in more than a decade

JEDDAH: In sweltering temperatures, Muslim pilgrims in Makkah converged on a vast tent camp in the desert on Friday, officially opening the annual Hajj pilgrimage. Ahead of their trip, they circled the Kaaba in the Grand Mosque, Islam’s holiest site.
More than 1.5 million pilgrims from around the world have already amassed in and around Makkah for the Hajj, and the number was still growing as more pilgrims from inside Saudi Arabia joined.  
Saudi authorities expected the number to exceed 2 million this year.
This year’s Hajj came against the backdrop of the raging war in the Gaza Strip between Israel and Palestinian militants, which pushed the Middle East to the brink of a regional war between Israel and its allies on one side and Iran-backed militant groups on the other.
Palestinians in the coastal enclave of Gaza were not able to travel to Makkah for Hajj this year because of the closure of the Rafah crossing in May when Israel extended its ground offensive to the strip’s southern city of Rafah on the border with Egypt.
“We pray for the Muslims, for our country and people, for all the Muslim world, especially for the Palestinian people,” Mohammed Rafeeq, an Indian pilgrim, said as he headed to the tent camp in Mina.

Pilgrims started Hajj by praying Fajr in the Grand Mosque in Makkah. (SPA)

Palestinian authorities said 4,200 pilgrims from the occupied West Bank arrived in Makkah for Hajj. Saudi authorities said 1,000 more from the families of Palestinians killed or wounded in the war in Gaza also arrived to perform Hajj at the invitation of King Salman of Saudi Arabia. The 1,000 invitees were already outside Gaza — mostly in Egypt — before the closure of the Rafah crossing.
“We are deprived of (performing) Hajj because the crossing is closed, and because of the raging wars and destruction,” said Amna Abu Mutlaq, a 75-year-old Palestinian woman in Gaza’s southern city of Khan Younis who had planned to perform Hajj this year but was unable to. “They (Israel) deprived us from everything.”
This year's Hajj also saw Syrian pilgrims traveling to Makkah on direct flights from Damascus for the first time in more than a decade. Syrians in rebel-held areas used to cross the border into neighboring Turkey in their trip to Makkah for Hajj.
“This is the natural thing: Pilgrims go to Hajj directly from their home countries,” said Abdel-Aziz al-Ashqar, a Syrian coordinator of the group of pilgrims who left Damascus this year for Hajj.

Pilgrims started Hajj by praying Fajr in the Grand Mosque in Makkah. (SPA)

The pilgrimage is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, and all Muslims are required to make the five-day Hajj at least once in their lives if they are physically and financially able to do so.
It is a moving spiritual experience for pilgrims who believe it absolves sins and brings them closer to God, while uniting the world’s more than 2 billion Muslims.  
For many Muslims, the Hajj is the only major journey that they make in their lives. Some spend years saving up money and waiting for a permit to embark on the journey in their 50s and 60s after raising their children.
The rituals during the Hajj largely commemorate the Quran’s accounts of Prophet Ibrahim, his son Prophet Ismail and Ismail’s mother Hajar — or Abraham and Ismael as they are named in the Bible.
Male pilgrims wear an ihram, two unstitched sheets of white cloth that resemble a shroud, while women dress in conservative, loose-fitting clothing with headscarves and forgo makeup and perfume. They have been making the ritual circuit around the Kaaba in the seven-minaret Grand Mosque since arriving in Makkah over recent days.
Saudi authorities have adopted security restrictions in and around Makkah, with checkpoints set up on roads leading to the city to prevent those who don’t have Hajj permits from reaching the holy sites.
Security authorities arrested many people who attempted to take pilgrims to Makkah who didn’t have Hajj permits, said Lt. Gen. Muhammad al-Bassami, head of the Hajj Security Committee. Most were expelled from the country, while travel agents faced jail for up to six months, according to the Interior Ministry.

Pilgrims head to Mina to spend the first day of Hajj. (SPA)

Many pilgrims whose documentations were not complete paid fines to be allowed into Makkah.  
On Friday, the pilgrims made their way to Mina, officially opening the Hajj. They then will move for a daylong vigil Saturday on Mount Arafat, a desert hill where the Prophet Muhammad is said to have delivered his final speech, known as the Farewell Sermon. Healthy pilgrims make the trip on foot, others use a bus or train.
The time of year when the Hajj takes place varies, given that it is set for five days in the second week of Dhu al-Hijjah, the last month in the Islamic lunar calendar.
Most of the Hajj rituals are held outdoors with little if any shade. When it falls in the summer months, temperatures can soar to over 40 Celsius. The Health Ministry has cautioned that temperatures at the holy sites could reach 48 Celsius.

Pilgrims head to Mina to spend the first day of Hajj. (SPA)

Many pilgrims carried umbrellas to use under the burning sun, and in Mina charities distributed cold water and cooling stations sprayed pilgrims with water to cool them down. The faithful set up in their tents, resting in the rows of cubicles and praying together to prepare for the coming rituals.
After Saturday’s warship in Arafat, pilgrims will travel a few kilometers to a site known as Muzdalifa to collect pebbles that they will use in the symbolic stoning of pillars representing the devil back in Mina.
Pilgrims then return to Mina for three days, coinciding with the festive Eid al-Adha holiday, when financially able Muslims around the world slaughter livestock and distribute the meat to poor people. Afterward, they return to Makkah for a final circumambulation, known as Farewell Tawaf.
In recent years, the annual pilgrimage has returned to its monumental scale after three years of heavy restrictions because of the coronavirus pandemic. In 2023, more than 1.8 million pilgrims performed Hajj, approaching the level in 2019, when more than 2.4 million participated.


Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah

Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah
Updated 59 min 48 sec ago
Follow

Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah

Muslims start Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah
  • 1,000 families of Palestinians killed or wounded in Gaza war also arrived to perform Hajj at the invitation of Saudi King Salman
  • This year's Hajj saw Syrian pilgrims traveling to Makkah on direct flights from Damascus for the first time in more than a decade

In sweltering temperatures, Muslim pilgrims in Makkah converged on a vast tent camp in the desert on Friday, officially opening the annual Hajj pilgrimage. Ahead of their trip, they circled the Kaaba in the Grand Mosque, Islam’s holiest site.
More than 1.5 million pilgrims from around the world have already amassed in and around Makkah for the Hajj, and the number was still growing as more pilgrims from inside Saudi Arabia joined.  
Saudi authorities expected the number to exceed 2 million this year.
This year’s Hajj came against the backdrop of the raging war in the Gaza Strip between Israel and Palestinian militants, which pushed the Middle East to the brink of a regional war between Israel and its allies on one side and Iran-backed militant groups on the other.
Palestinians in the coastal enclave of Gaza were not able to travel to Makkah for Hajj this year because of the closure of the Rafah crossing in May when Israel extended its ground offensive to the strip’s southern city of Rafah on the border with Egypt.
“We pray for the Muslims, for our country and people, for all the Muslim world, especially for the Palestinian people,” Mohammed Rafeeq, an Indian pilgrim, said as he headed to the tent camp in Mina.

Pilgrims started Hajj by praying Fajr in the Grand Mosque in Makkah. (SPA)

Palestinian authorities said 4,200 pilgrims from the occupied West Bank arrived in Makkah for Hajj. Saudi authorities said 1,000 more from the families of Palestinians killed or wounded in the war in Gaza also arrived to perform Hajj at the invitation of King Salman of Saudi Arabia. The 1,000 invitees were already outside Gaza — mostly in Egypt — before the closure of the Rafah crossing.
“We are deprived of (performing) Hajj because the crossing is closed, and because of the raging wars and destruction,” said Amna Abu Mutlaq, a 75-year-old Palestinian woman in Gaza’s southern city of Khan Younis who had planned to perform Hajj this year but was unable to. “They (Israel) deprived us from everything.”
This year's Hajj also saw Syrian pilgrims traveling to Makkah on direct flights from Damascus for the first time in more than a decade. Syrians in rebel-held areas used to cross the border into neighboring Turkey in their trip to Makkah for Hajj.
“This is the natural thing: Pilgrims go to Hajj directly from their home countries,” said Abdel-Aziz al-Ashqar, a Syrian coordinator of the group of pilgrims who left Damascus this year for Hajj.

Pilgrims started Hajj by praying Fajr in the Grand Mosque in Makkah. (SPA)

The pilgrimage is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, and all Muslims are required to make the five-day Hajj at least once in their lives if they are physically and financially able to do so.
It is a moving spiritual experience for pilgrims who believe it absolves sins and brings them closer to God, while uniting the world’s more than 2 billion Muslims.  
For many Muslims, the Hajj is the only major journey that they make in their lives. Some spend years saving up money and waiting for a permit to embark on the journey in their 50s and 60s after raising their children.
The rituals during the Hajj largely commemorate the Quran’s accounts of Prophet Ibrahim, his son Prophet Ismail and Ismail’s mother Hajar — or Abraham and Ismael as they are named in the Bible.
Male pilgrims wear an ihram, two unstitched sheets of white cloth that resemble a shroud, while women dress in conservative, loose-fitting clothing with headscarves and forgo makeup and perfume. They have been making the ritual circuit around the Kaaba in the seven-minaret Grand Mosque since arriving in Makkah over recent days.
Saudi authorities have adopted security restrictions in and around Makkah, with checkpoints set up on roads leading to the city to prevent those who don’t have Hajj permits from reaching the holy sites.
Security authorities arrested many people who attempted to take pilgrims to Makkah who didn’t have Hajj permits, said Lt. Gen. Muhammad al-Bassami, head of the Hajj Security Committee. Most were expelled from the country, while travel agents faced jail for up to six months, according to the Interior Ministry.

Pilgrims head to Mina to spend the first day of Hajj. (SPA)

Many pilgrims whose documentations were not complete paid fines to be allowed into Makkah.  
On Friday, the pilgrims made their way to Mina, officially opening the Hajj. They then will move for a daylong vigil Saturday on Mount Arafat, a desert hill where the Prophet Muhammad is said to have delivered his final speech, known as the Farewell Sermon. Healthy pilgrims make the trip on foot, others use a bus or train.
The time of year when the Hajj takes place varies, given that it is set for five days in the second week of Dhu al-Hijjah, the last month in the Islamic lunar calendar.
Most of the Hajj rituals are held outdoors with little if any shade. When it falls in the summer months, temperatures can soar to over 40 Celsius. The Health Ministry has cautioned that temperatures at the holy sites could reach 48 Celsius.

Pilgrims head to Mina to spend the first day of Hajj. (SPA)

Many pilgrims carried umbrellas to use under the burning sun, and in Mina charities distributed cold water and cooling stations sprayed pilgrims with water to cool them down. The faithful set up in their tents, resting in the rows of cubicles and praying together to prepare for the coming rituals.
After Saturday’s warship in Arafat, pilgrims will travel a few kilometers to a site known as Muzdalifa to collect pebbles that they will use in the symbolic stoning of pillars representing the devil back in Mina.
Pilgrims then return to Mina for three days, coinciding with the festive Eid al-Adha holiday, when financially able Muslims around the world slaughter livestock and distribute the meat to poor people. Afterward, they return to Makkah for a final circumambulation, known as Farewell Tawaf.
In recent years, the annual pilgrimage has returned to its monumental scale after three years of heavy restrictions because of the coronavirus pandemic. In 2023, more than 1.8 million pilgrims performed Hajj, approaching the level in 2019, when more than 2.4 million participated.


More than 35 million bottles of Zamzam water delivered to pilgrims

More than 35 million bottles of Zamzam water delivered to pilgrims
Updated 14 June 2024
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More than 35 million bottles of Zamzam water delivered to pilgrims

More than 35 million bottles of Zamzam water delivered to pilgrims
  • The gesture is part of ongoing efforts to ensure pilgrims have easy access to the sacred water throughout their Hajj journey

RIYADH: Al-Zamazma Company has distributed more than 35 million bottles of Zamzam water to residences and reception centers across Makkah, reported Saudi Press Agency on Friday.

The gesture is part of ongoing efforts to ensure pilgrims have easy access to the sacred water throughout their Hajj journey.

Yasser bin Sulaiman Shushu, board member of Al-Zamazma Company, praised the dedication of the teams which delivered the water.

Distribution is via the Zamzam digital platform, which integrates with the Ministry of Hajj and Umrah’s Nusuk platform, he said.


KSrelief delivers 25 tonnes of dates to World Food Programme in Guinea

KSrelief delivers 25 tonnes of dates to World Food Programme in Guinea
Updated 14 June 2024
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KSrelief delivers 25 tonnes of dates to World Food Programme in Guinea

KSrelief delivers 25 tonnes of dates to World Food Programme in Guinea

RIYADH: Saudi aid agency KSrelief has delivered 25 tonnes of dates to the World Food Programme’s office in Guinea, reported the Saudi Press Agency.

The dates were delivered in the presence of Saudi Ambassador Fahd bin Eid Al-Rashidi and representatives of the aid agency at WFP headquarters in Conakry, the country’s capital.

The WFP delegate in Conakry, Hyoung-Joon Lim, received the shipment on Thursday.


10 investors convicted for violating Saudi stock market rules

10 investors convicted for violating Saudi stock market rules
Updated 14 June 2024
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10 investors convicted for violating Saudi stock market rules

10 investors convicted for violating Saudi stock market rules
  • 1 imprisoned, all to pay total of $27.1m in fines, compensation
  • Manipulated share prices with false statements of firm’s health

RIYADH:Ten investors have been convicted of violating the Kingdom’s Capital Market Law and ordered to pay the government a total of $27.1 million in fines and compensation for losses, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Thursday.

The Appeal Committee for Resolution of Securities Disputes, or ACRSD, sentenced one of the individuals to imprisonment, the SPA report said. The “final decision” was issued by the ACRSD on Dec. 24, 2023.

The amount of $27.1 million comprised SR670,000 in fines and SR101 million as compensation for losses resulting from the violations committed in their investment portfolios, the report added.

The convictions, which included bans on trading for between one and two years, were announced online in detail by the ACRSD and the Capital Market Authority. According to the ACRSD statement, cases were filed against the 10 investors after referral by the CMA.

Several of the perpetrators had “illegally” disclosed internal information related to the financial position of Abdullah A.M. Al-Khodari & Sons Co. before it was made available to the public.

They had also falsely boosted the value of the firm to manipulate the share price and lure in unsuspecting investors.

In a statement posted on its website and on X, the CMA said: “One of the (convicted) was held responsible for making an incorrect statement in the announcement published by a listed company in the capital market.

“This was done to affect the price of the security or to urge others to purchase the security, in addition to his responsibility for neglecting to disclose essential developments in the company.”

In addition, others “engaged in trading based on the illegally disclosed internal information, intending to benefit from it before it was announced and made available to the general public.”

Named in the ruling were Mish’al bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari, Naif bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alali, Abdulaziz bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari, Ghada bint Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari, and Sami bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari.

The others named were Fawaz bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari, Jameel bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari, Ali bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari, Fawzi bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alali, and Fawzia bint Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alali.

Fawaz bin Abdullah bin Abdulmohsen Alkhudari was ordered to pay the CMA SR50.5 million because of the violations he committed in his investment portfolio.

The others were fined sums between SR100,000 and SR12 million.

Investors who had lost money have been urged to file claims for compensation, the SPA stated.