How a Saudi artist combines AI with conventional artistic techniques to create nostalgia-infused images

Special How a Saudi artist combines AI with conventional artistic techniques to create nostalgia-infused images
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Updated 31 May 2024
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How a Saudi artist combines AI with conventional artistic techniques to create nostalgia-infused images

How a Saudi artist combines AI with conventional artistic techniques to create nostalgia-infused images
  • Hadeel Mohammed uses generative AI to create images that depict daily life in Saudi Arabia during the 1990s
  • Rather than replace human creativity, Saudi artist believes AI will augment and improve the creative process

RIYADH: Artificial intelligence technologies have already found new and exciting applications in the workplace, health, education and business. Now, creative industries are finding novel ways to employ these mold-breaking tools.

Hadeel Mohammed, a Saudi AI artist, has used the technology to create nostalgia-infused images that depict various aspects of daily life in Saudi Arabia during the 1990s.

About a year ago, Mohammed took an interest in how technology and creativity can combine to make something entirely new, and began experimenting with AI to create bold visuals plucked from her imagination.

After earning a certificate in AI art, she was able to blend various digital editing methods with more conventional artistic techniques.




Saudi AI artist Hadeel Mohammed begins with a nostalgic memory or an old song and then uses AI algorithms to generate artworks that reflect the ideas and emotions that these evoke. (Supplied)

“Every artwork I create is quite personal and reflects my vision and personal growth to visualize ways to express myself,” she told Arab News.

Mohammed begins with a nostalgic memory or an old song. She then uses AI algorithms to generate artworks that reflect the ideas and emotions that these evoke.

“This is only the beginning of what you see in my work,” she said. “I then spend time refining, editing, changing details and improving compositions using different art software to reach the final photo, while also adding my personal touch to it.

“The end photo is a piece that tells a story and connects with viewers on a deeper level.”

Mohammed says she draws her inspiration from “how life was as a child living in the ‘90s.

“This is my vision of the past, and I try to use my imagination to produce unique art, particularly in the fashion, interiors, retro patterns, styles, colors used, music and way of life during that time. This might not reflect everyone’s lifestyle. I produce what evokes certain emotions.

“I remember my mother would often bring me to gatherings and I was fascinated by the lovely clothing worn by women at that time. To this day, I still enjoy looking at old photos to relive the beauty of that time and through my graphics, I hope to celebrate Saudi nostalgic fashion and lifestyle from the 1990s.”

Mohammed says that artworks that reflect the Saudi or Arab ‘90s can be difficult to produce “because AI’s knowledge of ‘female’ features is so limited,” resulting in her having to edit the photos to depict accurate features.

When curating an image, Mohammed focuses on the “mood and vibe” she is looking to convey.

“I love classic styles and use them a lot in my photos. They are timeless and full of elegance and nostalgia. For the color palette, I use earthy tones to bring a sense of coziness and warmth like shades of brown and beige. I remember them being called ‘royalty colors’ back in the ‘90s, while in the ‘80s, pastel colors and metallic accents were more used.”

She draws particular inspiration from the style of Saudi American businesswoman and editor Princess Deena Al-Juhani Abdulaziz for her fashion and her image as a modern and elegant Saudi woman.

Despite its game-changing applications, AI can be unpredictable. Mohammed says there are occasionally issues with photo resolution challenges in post-processing.

“Most of the time, I have to use editing software to change the composition and enhance the photos, as AI’s results sometimes are unpredictable and inaccurate,” she said.

“Photos generated by AI might be good for the screen, but they are not suitable for printing large-sized photos.

“AI is still limited by the data it is trained on. It only reproduces the same existing styles and techniques unless guided and edited by a human artist. This is where creativity comes in.”




Despite its game-changing applications, AI can be unpredictable, says Hadeel Mohammed. (Shutterstock image)

Instead of being restricted by the curbs that come with AI, Mohammed sees these limitations as an opportunity to learn new methods for generating and refining art.

“It is a fun journey that I enjoy and embrace with all its constraints. However, in order to produce beautiful work that represents my vision, I also combine AI technologies with standard art design.

“For art to be meaningful, it should reflect an emotional feeling and this cannot be done by a machine alone. Only a human can add real purpose and cultural insight to any type of art. Machines just make random pictures without understanding.”

Mohammed says AI still requires “the right people to choose the best art and know good art when they see it, as machines make many random photos. Not all of it is appealing.

“In summary, AI alone cannot substitute human vision, guidance, experience, and emotions to make art with true meaning and impact.”

As with all AI tools, advances are occurring rapidly.

“As technology develops, Al will create a greater variety of creative mediums and aesthetics and other fields like music and animation will be incorporated into technology,” said Mohammed.

“Also, algorithms will become more advanced and accessible and will not require much effort to meet our standards or ideas.”

And as AI tools become more widely used, their acceptance in the creative industries among artists is likely to grow.

“I think in the next few years, artists will be more accepting of AI-generated art, and it will also change the way that artists create their own work. I see that AI will probably become a common tool for artists, content creators and graphic designers.”

Rather than replace human creativity, Mohammed believes AI will augment and improve artworks.

“AI-generated art can become a major force in the art world and artists will experiment with new techniques to reach broader audiences. As people become more comfortable with AI’s capabilities, its influence in the art world will grow, leading to a rich and diverse landscape of artistic expression.

“I see a future where AI and human creativity work hand in hand.”

Evidence of this growing acceptance of AI-generated art can be found on Mohammed’s TikTok and Instagram accounts, where she has received positive feedback from her followers.

“I mostly receive a lot of positive feedback, both in comments and private messages,” she said.

“People regularly express their appreciation and thank me for bringing back old memories and feelings. They say that they enjoy and love my content. It makes me happy that, through visualizing memories through art, I can provide positivity and happiness to others.”
 

 


Deputy governor of Makkah washes the Holy Kaaba on behalf of King Salman

Deputy governor of Makkah washes the Holy Kaaba on behalf of King Salman
Updated 21 July 2024
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Deputy governor of Makkah washes the Holy Kaaba on behalf of King Salman

Deputy governor of Makkah washes the Holy Kaaba on behalf of King Salman
  • Upon his arrival, the deputy governor washed the interior of the Holy Kaaba with Zamzam water mixed with rose water

Makkah: The washing ceremony of the Holy Kaaba was carried out on Sunday by Deputy Gov. of Makkah Prince Saud bin Mishal bin Abdulaziz on behalf of King Salman, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

Upon his arrival at the Grand Mosque, he was received by Dr. Tawfiq Al-Rabiah, minister of Hajj and Umrah and chairman of the board of directors of the General Authority for the Care of the Two Holy Mosques, along with Sheikh Dr. Abdulrahman Al-Sudais, president of religious affairs at the Grand Mosque and Prophet’s Mosque.

Upon his arrival, the deputy governor washed the interior of the Holy Kaaba with Zamzam water mixed with rose water. Afterward, he performed two rak’ahs of Tawaf.

Al-Sudais said that washing the Holy Kaaba is an Islamic tradition, a prophetic Sunnah, and a reflection of Saudi leadership on the global stage.

He added: “God has blessed this country with the honor of serving and caring for the Two Holy Mosques and their visitors, establishing the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as the leader in this noble duty.

“This occasion is cherished by Muslims and the people of our country, as God has honored the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, its leadership, and its citizens with this privilege.”

He expressed his gratitude to the king and crown prince on the occasion and commended their provision of comprehensive services to worshipers and Umrah pilgrims.

Dr. Fawaz Al-Dahas, history professor at Umm Al-Qura University, told Arab News that “washing the Kaaba is a great honor that the Kingdom’s government performs every year. This exceptional event is an unparalleled honor, showcasing the Kingdom’s dedication and reverence for the holiest site on Earth.”

He explained that during this event, the outer covering, or kiswa, of the Kaaba is removed, and the inner walls are cleaned using Zamzam water mixed with rose water from Taif, along with the finest perfumes. Pieces of white cloth moistened with this mixture are used to wipe the inner walls and floor. After the cleaning process is completed, the Kaaba is covered again.

Dr. Ayed Al-Zahrani, professor of Islamic history, told Arab News that washing the Kaaba is a sacred Islamic tradition carried out annually in the month of Muharram.

He noted that the event is attended by senior state officials, including the governor of Makkah or his representative, along with prominent Islamic figures from around the world.

“The ceremony holds symbolic significance, representing moral and spiritual cleansing in preparation for the Umrah season, ensuring that pilgrims are received in a clean and purified environment,” he said.


Saudi designers win big at Tanween Challenge

Saudi designers win big at Tanween Challenge
Updated 21 July 2024
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Saudi designers win big at Tanween Challenge

Saudi designers win big at Tanween Challenge

DHAHRAN: Three projects from Saudi Arabia and one from Bahrain were selected recently as recipients of the annual Tanween Challenge, hosted by the King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture (Ithra).

At the six-day creative competition last week competitors displayed their final group projects at the Dhahran headquarters before a judging panel. Each project tried to solve a nature-related problem, in four categories: pavilion design; graphic design; furniture design; and fashion design. The four award-winning projects will be developed for commercial production.
Winners were selected from 80 participants who answered an open call for designers from the Middle East and North Africa. Tanween, Ithra’s flagship program since 2019, has become an integral part of fostering the thriving creative community in the region.
Sultan Al-Badran, creative programs developer at Ithra’s Ideas Lab said: “The winning projects today will receive support for the next couple of months by Tanween Challenges’ production partners to further develop the winners’ innovative ideas into real solutions. 
“The winning projects are a reflection of the individual capabilities and talent of each of the winners, who will now take their projects to market,” Al-Badran said. “Guided by knowledge partners Vanina, NYXO, LEAD, and Data is Beautiful, who provided support throughout the six-day event, all participants are creatives with immense potential who can continue their path of learning and challenge themselves to further develop their projects.”
Winning projects
Graphic Design Challenge: The project “Eyes Wide Open” won in this category. The team collected air pollution-related death figures between 1990 and 2021, and used two digital eyes to demonstrate the data — one representing the past and the other representing the present.
“The eyes were assembled to be facing each other, emphasizing the continuous influence of generational knowledge, values, and actions for future generations. The project aims to show that everyone’s contribution has effects on the environment,” Zahra Mansour, Deema Albuolayan and Fatima Bukhamseen said of their award-winning project.
Pavilion Design Challenge: “The project ‘The Determinal’ uses a steel structure in an artistic way to represent a deconstructed airport, applying the architectural school of deconstructionism,” said project winners Mohamed Alghoneimy, Turki Aljandal, Muzun bin Rubayan and Mahmood Alkawi, said.
The winning participants gathered different movement paths that take place simultaneously at airports — including the movements of people and aircraft — for the purpose of displaying the experience of movement that occurs in airports.

Centered around the concept of air as a communal lifeline, the “City Breathe” challenge asks: How can we repurpose industrial waste to construct a pavilion that purifies urban air to revitalize local communities and ecologies?

“This pavilion is envisioned as a nomadic structure, designed to be easily mounted and dismounted in various urban areas. Beyond its primary function as an air purifier, the pavilion aims to activate public space and foster interaction between city dwellers — both human and non-human. Constructed from industrial waste, it challenges us to rethink our relationship with materials and the environment,” they said in a statement. 
Furniture Design Challenge: The bench design “Bloom” was created with nature in mind — and as its muse. The design uses an organic shape and includes a shaded seating area and a space in which birds and cats can drink and feed. Abdullah Nasser Al-Battat, Ahmed Al-Arqan, Nader Al-Metairi, Nawaf Al-Ghamdi and Mohammed Al-Bayyabi were the winners of the challenge.
“Using additive manufacturing technology and locally sourced waste-based materials, participants are asked to craft provocative solutions that activate public spaces, while fostering co-habitation between human and non-human urban inhabitants. Through the power of design and innovation, we aim to create public interventions that enrich the lives of all species that call our cities home,” is how Ithra described the challenge criteria. 
Fashion Design Challenge: Inspired by the Arabian Gulf coast, the project “MRG” won this category, using sea salt and fish scales as their materials. The biodegradable bag “reflects the clarity of the sea, which is cherished not only for its beauty, but also for the stories it carries, reminding us of the deep connection we have to the sea and the importance of protecting it,” said winners Ghayda Al-Nasser, Ebaa Al-Taweel and Rawan Al-Salem of their project.
“Our goal is to turn them (the projects) into solutions that may have a positive impact on our relationship with nature, with the opportunity to display them in Ithra’s Tanween Conference in November,” Al-Badran concluded.
The Tanween Conference is at Ithra headquarters from Nov. 1-4, 2024.


KSrelief distributes hygiene kits in Sudan, Syria 

KSrelief distributes hygiene kits in Sudan, Syria 
Updated 21 July 2024
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KSrelief distributes hygiene kits in Sudan, Syria 

KSrelief distributes hygiene kits in Sudan, Syria 

RIYADH: The Saudi aid agency KSrelief has distributed hygiene kits to displaced and needy families in Sudan and Syria, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

The aid group gave out 620 kits to the needy in Sudan’s Sinar State, benefiting 3,100 people. The agency also handed out 435 shelter kits to 2,175 people in River Nile State, Sudan. 

KSrelief distributes 435 shelter bags in Sudan. (SPA)


In Syria, the group secured 796 hygiene kits in Idlib Governorate for 4,614 individuals from 769 families affected by last year’s earthquake.
The families in Idlib also received 769 food parcels.

KSrelief distributes 1,538 food parcels in Syria’s Idlib. (SPA)

 


Strawberry picking in Taif serves up a sweet summer escape

Strawberry picking in Taif serves up a sweet summer escape
Updated 20 July 2024
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Strawberry picking in Taif serves up a sweet summer escape

Strawberry picking in Taif serves up a sweet summer escape
  • Locations help create jobs during the summer season

TAIF: A strawberry farm in the rugged mountains of Al-Hada in Taif has emerged as a popular spot for visitors looking to escape the summer heat and appreciate the beauty of nature away from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Arab News recently visited the Al-Hada strawberry farm to see how it captures the essence of the region’s natural beauty and vibrant culture.

At Al-Hada farm in Taif, visitors can pick ripe strawberries and feed wildlife such as ducks, geese and parrots to the soothing sound of a nearby waterfall. (Supplied)

Located high in Al-Hada’s tourist area, the strawberry farm welcomes visitors all year round. The experience allows visitors to pick fresh berries and feed wildlife such as ducks, geese and parrots to the soothing sound of a nearby waterfall.

Along with a modest garden for birds and a lake for ducks and turtles, the space includes stalls selling ice cream, hot drinks and strawberry juice, among other refreshments. It also features seating areas and a cottage.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Turki Al-Ahmadi, Al-Hada farm’s founder, told Arab News that he had designed the farm in a way that draws visitors beyond harvest season from April to June.

• Entry to the farm in Al-Hada costs SR35 ($9).

Turki Al-Ahmadi, the farm’s founder, told Arab News that he had designed the farm in a way that draws visitors beyond harvest season from April to June. Various facilities to provide fun and relaxation in nature have been installed to this end.

At Al-Hada farm in Taif, visitors can pick ripe strawberries and feed wildlife such as ducks, geese and parrots to the soothing sound of a nearby waterfall. (Supplied)

His son, Bandar Al-Ahmadi, said that beside picking strawberries and enjoying the fresh fruit, the family are keen to make the farm a space where adults and children can learn about various types of trees.

The farm showcases models of trees including pomegranate, fig, tangerine, quince, apple and mulberry, with information about their habitat, method of irrigation, places of cultivation, and other key details about their lifespan.

We were told by many relatives who visited the strawberry farm in Al-Hada that their trip to Taif governorate would not be complete if they did not (go for) a strawberry-picking activity.

Hamid Al-Subhi, Visitor

“We were told by many relatives who visited the strawberry farm in Al-Hada that their trip to Taif governorate would not be complete if they did not (go for) a strawberry-picking activity,” Hamid Al- Subhi told Arab News during his visit recently.

At Al-Hada farm in Taif, visitors can pick ripe strawberries and feed wildlife such as ducks, geese and parrots to the soothing sound of a nearby waterfall. (Supplied)

Al-Subhi, who drove from Makkah with his family, was fascinated by the farm’s facilities: “Picking your own strawberries at the farm is really something … my kids really enjoyed it and being on the top of the mountain with such a cool weather really makes our visit more enjoyable.”

Abdul Mohsin Al-Qadi, a visitor from Jeddah, said that the strawberry-picking experience was hugely rewarding for him and his family.

“It is a must-visit destination and a breathtaking view,” he said. “This is our first time visiting this farm and we really enjoyed all activities, from handpicking our strawberries to other family-friendly activities at the small garden for birds and the lake of ducks and turtles,” he said. “It is a great way to enjoy the beauty of the area while also learning about local culture and heritage.”

Entry to the farm in Al-Hada costs SR35 ($9). Strawberry farms can also be found in Abha, Hail and Qatif.

 

 


Heritage meets urban arts at Asir’s Al-Asabila Palaces

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)
The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)
Updated 21 July 2024
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Heritage meets urban arts at Asir’s Al-Asabila Palaces

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)
  • Locations help create jobs during the summer season

RIYADH: The famous heritage palaces in the Asir region have become tourist destinations, offering a rich blend of history and culture.

The Saudi Press Agency reported that these sites also boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season.

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)

The Al-Asabila Palaces, which are situated in Al-Namas Governorate some 150 km south of Abha, have become a major attraction. Situated in the heart of Al-Namas, these palaces now draw hundreds of visitors daily, both tourists and locals, according to the SPA. Their popularity has surged following their inauguration by Prince Turki bin Talal bin Abdulaziz, chairman of the Asir Development Authority.

Visitors begin their tour of the palaces by shopping in areas dedicated to traditional fashions, antiques, and gifts that showcase the heritage and arts of the Asir region.

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)

They can then relax with coffee and hot drinks before exploring the Abs Palace, which has been restored to welcome guests.

Tourist guide Saleh Al-Shehri told the SPA: “At the beginning of the Saudi era the palaces served as the headquarters for various government agencies, including the court, and as venues for national events.”

FASTFACTS

• Al-Asabila Palaces are situated in Al-Namas governorate some 150 km south of Abha.

• These palaces now draw hundreds of visitors daily, both tourists and locals, Saudi Press Agency reports.

• The initiative to restore the palaces was taken by their owners and helped transform them into a tourist and cultural attraction, says tour guide.

He added that the initiative to restore the palaces was taken by their owners and helped transform them into a tourist and cultural attraction. This effort aligned with the Kingdom’s Vision 2030, which aims to revitalize the area and boost domestic tourism.

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)

Historian Amr bin Gharamah Al-Amrawi says that Al-Namas was established in 1363-1364. However, it only received the name Al-Namas about 150 years ago, being previously known as Al-Waad village.

It was later named after the trees in the surrounding areas and the adjacent valley, while the presence of a well called Al-Namasa also contributed to the village being renamed Al-Namas.

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)

The heritage site features several palaces, including Abs, Mishref, Turban, and Kharif. These structures, which range from two to three floors in height, are examples of the traditional construction style of the Asir region.

The palaces contain 60 rooms and span a total area of about 5,000 sq. meters. The exteriors are of white limestone, extracted from white quartz stone, while the roofs feature wood, leaves, and juniper. The interiors are finished with plaster mixed with clay.

The heritage palaces in Asir boost economic activity by creating job opportunities during the summer season. (SPA)

According to the SPA, the area is home to numerous archaeological sites from various periods, the most famous location being Al-Jahwah village, mentioned by the traveler Al-Hamdani, which is located east of the present-day Al-Namas Governorate.

Al-Amrawi added that the governorate contains Islamic inscriptions in mountains known as Al-Sijin, Al-Gharamah, Dhul-Ain, Ajama, and Qarn Al-Ghala.