SR70bn pilgrimage bonanza forecast

Updated 25 September 2014

SR70bn pilgrimage bonanza forecast

Economists predict more than SR70 billion in revenues from this year’s Haj and Umrah seasons, according to experts.
Abdullah Al-Marzoouq, a professor of Haj economy at Umm Al-Qura University in Makkah, told Arab News there are positive indicators for enhanced Haj profits.
“This is thanks to the 9 million pilgrims who will have performed Haj and Umrah this year,” he said.
Al-Marzoouq called for greater efforts to create more job opportunities for Saudis during the Haj and Umrah seasons.
Abdulkhaleq Al-Kashef, director of the Haj Research Center, said that Haj service companies will undoubtedly take advantage of the upcoming Haj season.
“The large Haj and Umrah market will increase the sale of Saudi products, which includes gift items,” said Khaled Ramadan, the manager of a Haj and Umrah service company.
Ramadan told Arab News that Saudi-made gift items are facing big competition from Chinese products.
He stressed the need for strengthening the capabilities of young Saudi men and women in making innovative gift items with a Makkah and Madinah touch for sale among pilgrims and other visitors.
Ramadan believes that Saudi products could make a revenue of SR500 million to SR800 million annually if properly marketed.
Saleh Al-Rasheed, the owner of a shop selling souvenirs and gifts, urged Saudi youth to start small and medium-sized enterprises to produce gift items to market among pilgrims.
“This is a potential goldmine for young Saudis,” he said.
“It can also create more seasonal jobs for Saudis during the Haj season,” he added.
The Ministry of Haj, meanwhile, has implemented a plan to crack down on fake Haj operators who fleece customers by collecting money for Haj in advance and then vanish without a trace. Bogus operators often shut down their offices and keep their mobiles switched off, leaving their victims in the lurch.
The ministry is also monitoring the service category of Haj operators, since many claim to offer “VIP” services in order to con their victims into paying higher amounts.
Authorities have advised residents to be cautious while dealing with Haj operators.
“The Haj Ministry will closely monitor the marketing and advertisement campaigns of local Haj operators to prevent fraud,” said Haj Minister Bandar Hajjar.


Japan’s capital sees prices fall most in over 8 years as COVID-19 pain persists

Updated 27 November 2020

Japan’s capital sees prices fall most in over 8 years as COVID-19 pain persists

  • Tokyo core CPI marks biggest annual drop since May 2012
  • Data suggests nationwide consumer prices to stay weak

TOKYO: Core consumer prices in Tokyo suffered their biggest annual drop in more than eight years, data showed on Friday, an indication the hit to consumption from the coronavirus crisis continued to heap deflationary pressure on the economy.
The data, which is considered a leading indicator of nationwide price trends, reinforces market expectations that inflation will remain distant from the Bank of Japan’s 2% target for the foreseeable future.
“Consumer prices will continue to hover on a weak note as any economic recovery will be moderate,” said Dai-ichi Life Research Institute, which expects nationwide core consumer prices to fall 0.5% in the fiscal year ending March 2021.
The core consumer price index (CPI) for Japan’s capital, which includes oil products but excludes fresh food prices, fell 0.7% in November from a year earlier, government data showed, matching a median market forecast.
It followed a 0.5% drop in October and marked the biggest annual drop since May 2012, underscoring the challenge policymakers face in battling headwinds to growth from COVID-19.
The slump in fuel costs and the impact of a government campaign offering discounts to domestic travel weighed on Tokyo consumer prices, the data showed.
Japan’s economy expanded in July-September from a record post-war slump in the second quarter, when lockdown measures to prevent the spread of the virus cooled consumption and paralyzed business activity.
Analysts, however, expect any recovery to be modest with a resurgence in global and domestic infections clouding the outlook, keeping pressure on policymakers to maintain or even ramp up stimulus.