Hadid mania grips Paris as Saab channels the dark

A model presents a creation by Elie Saab during the women’s fall-winter 2017-2018 ready-to-wear collection fashion show, on Saturday in Paris. (AFP)
Updated 06 March 2017
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Hadid mania grips Paris as Saab channels the dark

PARIS: It was Lebanese designer Elie Saab’s first collection since his coup of dressing Meryl Streep for the Oscars following the actress’ high-profile spat with Chanel.
The deep blue embellishments of Streep’s lauded Oscars gown were picked up again in Saturday’s fall-winter Paris show, inspired by the magical, romantic ballet Giselle.
Meanwhile, Paris Fashion Week went gaga for the Hadid sisters.
The half-Palestinian sibling models Bella, 20, and Gigi, 21, continue to dominate coverage at Paris Fashion Week for both professional and personal reasons — their every move is snapped by photographers.
Gigi Hadid was branded a rock of solidarity by the fashion press simply for holding the hand of her sister, Bella, at H&M’s runway show as they strutted out for the finale awkwardly past Bella’s ex-boyfriend, The Weeknd, who was performing.
Then there was a media alert sent out because Gigi went outside Friday night with partner Zayn Malik.
Friday night also saw Bella crowned the face of Dior’s new Diorshow Pump & Volume mascara. She posed for cameras at the posh launch party in a sheeny, satin bustier gown, with a folded petal-like detail at the bust.
It is a mania that is not going away soon.
Meanwhile, at Saab’s show, dark romanticism wafted in the air with decorative gowns made from velvet, feathers, ribbon and lace — against the set of dark shards of blue light.
There were some lighter touches too. Tulle organza and silk chiffon fluttered by on diaphanous gowns with high necks that borrowed from Victorian or Edwardian styles.
But the collection tried to do too much.
Overly divergent styles — such as thigh-high leather boots, an electric blue fur coat and black biker jacket — took away from the collection’s coherence.


Egyptian singer Sherine banned after claiming lack of free speech

Updated 23 March 2019
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Egyptian singer Sherine banned after claiming lack of free speech

  • The singer, who hosts the Arabic version of “The Voice,” apologized again after the latest remarks in a TV interview aired late Friday, saying she was joking
  • Last year, Sherine was sentenced to six months in prison over a similar clip from a concert in which she joked that the Nile is polluted

CAIRO: An Egyptian singer has been banned from performing in her home country after suggesting that it does not respect free speech.
A video clip circulated online shows Sherine Abdel-Wahab, during a performance in Bahrain, saying: “Here I can say whatever I want. In Egypt, anyone who talks gets imprisoned.”
Egypt’s Musicians Union responded late Friday by barring the singer, popularly known by her first name, from performing. It also summoned her for questioning.
Samir Sabry, a pro-government lawyer with a reputation for moral vigilantism and suing celebrities, filed a complaint against the singer accusing her of “insulting Egypt and inviting suspicious rights groups to interfere in Egypt’s affairs.”
Last year, Sherine was sentenced to six months in prison over a similar clip from a concert in which she joked that the Nile is polluted. The sentence was suspended upon appeal. She apologized for the remark, calling it a “bad joke.”
The singer, who hosts the Arabic version of “The Voice,” apologized again after the latest remarks in a TV interview aired late Friday, saying she was joking.
“I am very tired. I made a mistake. I am sorry. I appeal the president of the Arab Republic of Egypt, who is our father. I feel that I was persecuted. I did nothing. I love Egypt,” she said.
Egyptian authorities have waged an unprecedented crackdown on dissent since President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi led the military overthrow of Mohammed Mursi in 2013. The local media is dominated by pro-government outlets that attack anyone seen as criticizing the country or its leaders, and several people have been jailed or fined for violating vaguely written laws outlawing such criticism.