Qatar bans new ‘Wonder Woman’ movie

Gal Gadot from a scene in "Wonder Woman." (AP)
Updated 30 June 2017
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Qatar bans new ‘Wonder Woman’ movie

JEDDAH: Qatar has banned the blockbuster movie “Wonder Woman,” according to local English language newspaper Doha News.
The film has received worldwide critical acclaim. But it has also caused outrage because the lead actress, Gal Gadot, is from Israel, and she has previously posted on social media messages supporting the country’s military action in Lebanon.
Earlier in June Lebanon and Tunisia banned the movie from being screened. But it currently remains on show at cinemas in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Oman and Bahrain.
The film was due to premiere in Doha on Thursday, but any reference to “Wonder Woman” was removed from all cinema websites across the country.
On June 13, Vox were celebrating the countdown to the day the movie was due to premiere in the City:


But days later on June 28, the cinema chain Vox responded to queries, confirming it was no longer going to be shown.

Actress, Gadot, carried out her compulsory Israeli military service in 2006, which coincided with the Israeli war in Lebanon.
On Facebook she previously sent her “love and prayers to my fellow Israeli citizens. Especially to all the boys and girls who are risking their lives protecting my country against the horrific acts conducted by Hamas, who are hiding like cowards behind women and children…We shall overcome!!!”
Gadot also expressed support for the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) during the 2014 Gaza conflict.

 


Prominent Egyptian poet, Gamila El Alaily, honored with Google Doodle

Updated 21 min 10 sec ago
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Prominent Egyptian poet, Gamila El Alaily, honored with Google Doodle

  • She became prominent when she joined the Apollo Society, an elite all-boys club for poets, writers, and artists
  • She died on April 11, 1991

DUBAI: Egyptian poet and essayist Gamila El Alaily has been honored with a Google Doodle on what would have been her 112th birthday.

Born in Mansoura, Dakahlia in Egypt in 1907, El Alaily was “one of the leading women of Egypt’s modern art renaissance,” and was celebrated for her contribution to Arab literature.

Gamila El Alaily. (Facebook)

She became even more prominent when she joined the Apollo Society, an elite all-boys club for poets, writers, and artists founded by Egyptian poet Ahmed Zaki Abu Shadi – making El Alaily the sole female member of the group, which pioneered modernism in the region’s literary scene.

El Alaily was inspired by the founders of the esteemed group, which at the time was regarded as the most prominent poetry circle in Egypt and the Arab world.

After moving to Cairo, El Alaily contributed to an Egyptian literary journal, also called “Apollo,” and drew inspiration from another distinguished Arab writer, Lebanese-Palestinian May Ziade.

She went on to publish her own poetry, producing three volumes in total, the first one titled “The Echo of my Dreams,” where she explored themes of love, longing, and contemplation.

A picture of Gamila El Alaily displayed on the wall. (Facebook)

El Alaily also wrote a regular column for over 40 years in a self-published monthly newsletter. She would write about ethics and values, as well as her insights on women’s role in society.

She died on April 11, 1991.

A podcast uploaded in 2015 discussed El Alaily’s life and works, with the show guesting some of the late poet’s relatives, as well as scholars who studied her body of work.

Listen to the podcast here: