Arab countries score low on crime, highest on safety in world survey

A police patrol car in Abu Dhabi, UAE, where crime levels are low and people say they are the safest (Shutterstock)
Updated 09 August 2017
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Arab countries score low on crime, highest on safety in world survey

DUBAI: Arab cities are the safest places to live in the Asia, Africa and the world, according to the website Numbeo, which analysis data on crime and safety statistics and people’s perceptions.
The list, which is based on the latest information, provides two sets of numbers for the 334 cities listed, a score for crime levels and another for safety.
Abu Dhabi was rated the safest country and for the lowest crime level, both in Asia and the world, while Tunisia came top for safety and low crime in Africa.
The figures are created from a series of surveys and research that look at statistics from countries, but also people’s perceptions of crime and safety.
“(The) Crime Index is an estimation of overall level of crime in a given city or a country,” the Numbeo website explains.
“We consider crime levels lower than 20 as very low, crime levels between 20 and 40 as being low, crime levels between 40 and 60 as being moderate, crime levels between 60 and 80 as being high and finally crime levels higher than 80 as being very high.”
The Safety Index is scored the other way, with the higher number indicating a safer city.
Abu Dhabi scored 13.22 for crime and 86.78 for safety. In contrast San Pedro Sula, in Honduras, scored 84.25 for crime and 15.75 for safety.
While these figures put Abu Dhabi at the top for low crime and safety both in Asia and globally, Dhaka in Bangladesh scored 69.92 for crime and 30.08 for safety.

The top 10 Asian cities with low crime and high safety levels
City Crime Safety
Abu Dhabi, UAE 13.54 86.46
Doha, Qatar 15.87 84.13
Singapore 16.90 83.10
Taipei, Taiwan 17.38 82.62
Tokyo, Japan 19.38 80.62
Dubai, UAE 19.52 80.48
Hong Kong 20.07 79.93
Osaka, Japan 20.13 79.87
Tbilisi, Georgia 20.37 79.63
Bursa, Turkey 21.12 78.88



Perhaps surprising was Kuala Lumpur which had the second worst crime levels of the 91 countries listed for Asia, at 68.53 and 31.47 for safety. Baghdad, in Iraq came 16 with a crime figure of 57.47 and safety scoring 42.53.
Doha came a close second after the UAE capital, scoring 15.71 for crime and 84.29 for safety.
Dubai came in at 331 in the world list and 83 – just five places behind Abu Dhabi – for Asia, with a crime number of 19.52 and 80.48 for safety.

The top 10 African cities with low crime and high safety levels
City Crime Safety
Tunis, Tunisia 36.11 63.89
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 44.46 55.54
Algiers, Algeria 49.99 50.01
Harare, Zimbabwe 51.98 48.02
Casablanca, Morocco 53.24 46.76
Cairo, Egypt 55.96 44.04
Tripoli, Libya 58.06 41.94
Nairobi, Kenya 63.03 36.97
Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania 65.80 34.20
Lagos, Nigeria 68.08 31.92



Meanwhile Tunis in Tunisia had the lowest crime level for Africa with 36.15 and the highest for safety with 63.85. This was in contrast with Pietermaritzburg with crime at 82.09 and 17.91 for safety.
What the researchers do concede is that a high crime level score can indicate a greater level of reported incidents than other places that score lower rather than a higher crime level.


Rare footage of Brazil tribe threatened by loggers: activists

Grab of a video shot by Midia India on August 2018 and released by Survival International activits of a purportedly uncontacted member of a Brazilian indigenous tribe hunting in the Amazon rainforest near Sao Luis, Maranhao, Brazil. (AFP)
Updated 23 July 2019
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Rare footage of Brazil tribe threatened by loggers: activists

  • Since taking office in January, Bolsonaro has been accused of harming the Amazon rainforest and indigenous peoples in order to benefit loggers, miners and farmers who helped get him elected

RIO DE JANEIRO: Rare footage of purportedly uncontacted members of a Brazilian indigenous tribe hunting in the Amazon rainforest was released Monday by activists who warn the group could be wiped out by logging.
The 58-second clip filmed in the northern state of Maranhao shows members of the Awa tribe, which Survival International says has been frequently attacked by loggers who have been emboldened by pro-business President Jair Bolsonaro.
“Only a global outcry stands between them and genocide,” said Stephen Corry, director of Survival International, which published the video that had been shot by a member of neighboring indigenous tribe Guajajara. The footage was shot in August, the NGO said.
“Loggers have already killed many of their relatives and forced others out of the forest.
“President Bolsonaro and his friends in the logging industry would like nothing more than for those who still survive to be eliminated.”
In the footage, a young man holding a machete in the rainforest appears to sniff the blade before he looks toward the person filming him. Seconds later he and other members of the tribe carrying spears run away.
“We didn’t have the Awa’s permission to film, but we know that it’s important to use these images because if we don’t show them around the world, the Awa will be killed by loggers,” said Erisvan Guajajara of Midia India, an indigenous film-making association.
Members of the Guajajara tribe belong to the Guardians of the Amazon group, which aims to protect isolated indigenous people.
While most Awa have been contacted, some are known to still live uncontacted in an area of rainforest that is being “rapidly destroyed,” Survival International said.
Since taking office in January, Bolsonaro has been accused of harming the Amazon rainforest and indigenous peoples in order to benefit loggers, miners and farmers who helped get him elected.
Bolsonaro, whose anti-environment rhetoric has included a pledge to end “Shiite ecologist activism,” has questioned the latest official figures showing deforestation increased 88 percent in June compared with the same period last year.
He uses the word “Shiite” as a synonym for radicalism rather than denoting a branch of Islam.
“We are experiencing a real environmental psychosis,” Bolsonaro said Sunday.
Bolsonaro also accused foreign journalists Friday of wanting Brazil’s estimated 800,000 indigenous people to remain in a “prehistoric state, without access to technology, science and the thousand wonders of modernity.”