Washington hosts Saudi Arabian & Middle East Legal Forum

The forum was organized by the Georgetown Arab Lawyers Organization (GALO) and the Saudi Law Training Center (SLTC), under the supervision of the Saudi American Public Relation Affairs Committee (SAPRAC).
Updated 03 April 2018
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Washington hosts Saudi Arabian & Middle East Legal Forum

WASHINGTON: The Saudi Arabian & Middle East Legal Forum took place in the US capital on Tuesday and Wednesday.
It was organized by the Georgetown Arab Lawyers Organization (GALO) and the Saudi Law Training Center (SLTC), under the supervision of the Saudi American Public Relation Affairs Committee (SAPRAC).
Attendees and participants included more than 350 prominent Saudi and American figures from various fields, including education, law, economics, business and media.
The forum discussed ways to attract international investment and develop the Saudi economy in the fields of energy, transport, financial services, trade, sports and entertainment.
The event also discussed doing business within the Saudi legal system, and the impact of legal reform and transparency on privatization projects and partnerships between the public and private sectors in the fields of trade, health care and entertainment.
The forum discussed Saudi and Middle Eastern arbitration and judicial systems, and outlined new challenges and opportunities in the fields of health care, energy and transport.
The conference was opened by GALO President Ahmed Medhat Karoub, who praised the Kingdom’s opening of its economy and society, and the international community’s embrace of this.
He said Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s Vision 2030 reform plan is derived from his appreciation of, and support for, innovation and science.
The Kingdom has made great strides in many areas, reflecting decision-makers’ efforts to establish a legal system and working environment that will help create a prosperous and sustainable economy, Karoub added.
Andrew Patterson, a board member of the International Environmental Business Organization, said during a panel discussion that the Kingdom is investing in its youth via Vision 2030.
Andrea Sherman, professor of law at Georgetown University, said: “I am very pleased to participate in the conference, which brought back wonderful memories of my time in Saudi Arabia as legal adviser to a number of elite companies.”
He praised the organization of the conference, and the ambition of young Saudi men and women to improve their society and country.
Stephen Hammond, a lawyer and partner at Hughes Hubbard & Reed, said the forum exceeded all expectations in addressing all issues relating to the Kingdom’s future and Vision 2030.
Such events are important in correctly presenting Saudi society, especially from a legal perspective, he added.
Saudi Justice Ministry Judge Sheikh Saleh Al-Saawi said laws and regulations enacted by the Kingdom’s leadership guarantee the judiciary’s independence and social justice for all its citizens.
Dr. Nouf Al-Ghamdi, a legal adviser and member of several accredited legal committees, praised the aims of Vision 2030 to strengthen the fields of entertainment, sports and tourism, and to encourage women’s participation in the workforce and in decision-making.
Attorney Majed Karoub, head of the SLTC, expressed pride in the conference’s success.
The Kingdom’s future lies in its youths’ determination to enable it to compete with developed countries in all sectors, he said.
SAPRAC’s vice president of media, Reem Daffa, said the forum successfully merged Saudi and American cultures.
It was a unique opportunity to link Saudi law students with a network of experts in various legal disciplines that are necessary in the Kingdom in light of Vision 2030, she added.


At least 11 wounded in Somalia Al-Shabab claimed attack

Updated 23 March 2019
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At least 11 wounded in Somalia Al-Shabab claimed attack

  • Authorities have not said if there are any deaths in the attack
  • The extremist group is fighting against foreign influences which they see as heretic

MOGADISHU: At least 11 people were wounded when gunmen set off explosions and stormed government ministries in Somalia’s capital Saturday in an attack claimed by the Al-Shabab extremist group, police said.
“There can be others inside but we have so far collected eleven people wounded in the attack,” said Abdukadir Abdirahman Adan, director of the Aamin ambulance service in the capital Mogadishu.
Police say the assault began when two explosions were set off near the ministries of public works and labor.
Gunmen entered the buildings following the blasts.
“The security forces rescued many of the staff from the buildings and they are still engaging some gunmen who managed to enter the building after the blast,” said security commander Ahmed Adan.
It remained unclear if there were any deaths in the attack.
The attack was claimed by the Al-Shabab extremist group, which is fighting an armed insurrection in Somalia against what it sees as heretic and foreign influence.
Attacks that use a combination of bombs and gunmen have become a hallmark of the insurgents.
Earlier this month, at least 20 people died in an attack in Mogadishu which saw Al-Shabab extremists battling security forces for nearly 24 hours.
The group also claimed responsibility for a March 7 car bombing near a restaurant in the capital that killed four people.