Hijab-inspired hats, popcorn at Calvin Klein show

A model presents a creation from Calvin Klein Fall/Winter 2018 collection during the New York Fashion Week. (Reuters)
Updated 14 February 2018
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Hijab-inspired hats, popcorn at Calvin Klein show

NEW YORK: A-list stars Nicole Kidman, Lupita Nyong’o and Margot Robbie flocked to Calvin Klein on Tuesday, wading through popcorn to watch Raf Simons’s latest meditation on Americana, where firefighter meets prairie.
The Belgian’s stewardship of the iconic US label, now into a second year, is one of the few bright spots in a New York Fashion Week suffering from an identity crisis, thinning schedule and a glut between the passing of one generation and the search for another.
Ruby Sterling again designed the set. Barns evoked the pioneer spirit of the prairies, adorned with work by Andy Warhol, and a room ankle deep in popcorn.
Model of the moment Kaia Gerber, 16, walked the runway, dressed in waders, watched by proud parents Cindy Crawford and Rande Gerber.
Simons said the collection evolved his window-onto-America theme for his Calvin Klein, this time referencing the discovery of America, the 1960s space race and the 21st century information age.
He said it was about freedom, democracy and no cultural hierarchy, listing 50 words in place of 50 states that included pioneer, firefighter, prairie, industrial and, of course, popcorn.
Clothes ticked the modesty trend for 2018 fall/winter, full skirts practically to the ground and boxy outerwear, with models kitted out in knitted balaclavas or hijab-inspired hats shielding hair and neck.
There was an emergency responder vibe in orange outerwear and pants, fluorescent strips on jackets, giant wader-style boots over the knee in both shiny black and white and baggy sweaters.
Giant silver gloves tapped the oven mitten look, a space-age version of the Ralph Lauren’s tasselled beige numbers that divided opinion for the US Winter Olympics team in Pyeongchang.
There was a utilitarian, workman-like feel, and clear odes to America — patchwork quilts and red checked fannel. Yet however striking and original, it did not shriek wearable.


S. Korea’s last polar bear dies ahead of British retirement

Updated 18 October 2018
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S. Korea’s last polar bear dies ahead of British retirement

  • Tongki — a 23-year-old male named after a Japanese cartoon character of the 1980s — lived in a 330-square-meter (3,500-square-foot) concrete enclosure at the Everland theme park outside Seoul
  • The autopsy results suggested that Tongki appeared to have died of old age

SEOUL: The last polar bear kept in South Korea has died of old age only weeks before his planned departure to better living conditions in Britain, zoo officials said Thursday.
Tongki — a 23-year-old male named after a Japanese cartoon character of the 1980s — lived in a 330-square-meter (3,500-square-foot) concrete enclosure at the Everland theme park outside Seoul.
The zoo had planned to move him to the Yorkshire Wildlife Park next month to allow him to enjoy his final days in more appropriate surroundings — the facility in northern England has a 40,000 square meter polar reserve — and had thrown him a farewell party in June.
But Tongki was found dead on Wednesday night and autopsy results suggested that he appeared to have died of old age, the zoo said in a statement, adding it plans to conduct more tests to determine the exact reason for his death.
The average life span of polar bears is around 25 years and Tongki was the equivalent of around 80 in human terms.
“We have designated this week as a period of mourning for Tongki and decorated his living space so visitors can say farewell,” a zoo official told AFP.
Born in captivity at a zoo in the southern city of Masan, Tongki was the only polar bear still living in South Korea and had been alone at Everland since the last fellow resident of his species died three years ago.
Everland said Tongki will not be replaced, and other South Korean zoos have no plans to import the animals, which are classed as “vulnerable” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of endangered species.