Rihanna's 'Fenty Beauty' arrives in Saudi Arabia

Updated 10 April 2018
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Rihanna's 'Fenty Beauty' arrives in Saudi Arabia

  • The make-up brand will be available in the Kingdom this month
  • Fenty Beauty was named 2017’s best innovation by Time
Jeddah: Rihanna’s make-up brand is coming to Saudi Arabia this April.
According to the singer’s official Twitter account, Fenty Beauty, named 2017’s best innovation by Time, is coming to the Kingdom on April 19.
The superstar launched Fenty Beauty last Sept. 8 with a promise to make all women feel included; she succeeded by releasing 40 different shades of the Pro Filt’R foundation, dazzling women of all skin tones. By Sept. 17, the brand had hit Middle Eastern markets in Bahrain, Kuwait and the UAE.
The announcement coincides with the star’s launch of the luminizer, Body Lava, which she earlier mentioned has already sold out on her Instagram account.
A Saudi female, Hind or @Pwrfulgurl, responded to the tweet with, “I hope she has a concert here soon!”
Other fans also greeted the news with avid enthusiasm.
Shams AlHarbi @ITAENG, said: “I’m so happy, wish you the best,” and @eti1_ tweeted: “Is this for real or should I get my eyes checked?”
@3lmadina couldn’t believe the news: “Rihanna, is that an #April_Fools, please say no!”

Others received the news with light jabs because of the singer/actress’s relationship with her Saudi boyfriend, Hassan Jameel.
@R67nia tweeted: “She’s coming to visit her in-laws,” and @im_7ano responded with “Hassan Jameel did all the ladies a favor.”
Some tweets hope it is an indicator of a surprise visit, and that Rihanna will come to Saudi Arabia’s capital, Riyadh, for the launch.
So far there has been nothing to support or deny those rumors.
 


Cambodian women face surrogacy charges after Vietnam births

A woman rides a motor-cart loaded with bananas in Phnom Penh on July 18, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 9 min 28 sec ago
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Cambodian women face surrogacy charges after Vietnam births

  • The surrogacy business boomed in Cambodia after it was put under tight restrictions in neighboring Thailand. There also were crackdowns in India and Nepal

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia: Three Cambodian women have been charged with violating surrogacy and human trafficking laws after they gave birth to babies they delivered to Chinese nationals in Vietnam, a court official said Friday.
Phnom Penh Municipal Court spokesman Ei Rin said the women, aged 31 and 32, are being detained pending further investigation after being charged on Thursday.
Chhiv Phally, the director of the Interior Ministry’s Human Trafficking and Juvenile Protection Department, said the three women were detained by Vietnamese police and returned to Cambodia after they illegally crossed into the country to deliver their children to Chinese nationals for $8,000 per child, reported the English-language Phnom Penh Post newspaper.
Cambodia’s anti-surrogacy law carries a penalty of one to six months in prison, while the human trafficking charge, involving crossing borders, is punishable by 15 to 20 years’ imprisonment.
The anti-surrogacy law was intended to target intermediaries between parents and surrogates, but in the absence of a more appropriate law, has also been applied against women who carry surrogate pregnancies and give birth. The government has said it is drafting a new law to cover surrogacy, but it is not known when it will be ready.
Cambodia hurriedly passed its first law specifically targeting surrogacy in 2016 as the country was becoming a popular destination for foreign would-be parents seeking women to give birth to their children.
Developing countries are popular for surrogacy because costs are much lower than in countries such as the United States and Australia, where surrogate services can cost around $150,000. The surrogacy business boomed in Cambodia after it was put under tight restrictions in neighboring Thailand. There also were crackdowns in India and Nepal.
After Cambodia’s crackdown, would-be parents shifted to seek out surrogates in neighboring Laos.
In December, 32 Cambodian women who were charged with human trafficking for serving as surrogate mothers were released from detention after agreeing to keep the babies rather than giving them up as originally planned.