South Korean kills neighbor’s dog, invites him to share meat

Updated 12 April 2018
0

South Korean kills neighbor’s dog, invites him to share meat

SEOUL: A South Korean farmer killed and cooked a neighbor’s barking dog before inviting its unsuspecting owner to join him for a dog-meat dinner, police said Wednesday, in a case that has sparked online outrage.

The 62-year-old unnamed man confessed to the crime after another neighbor tipped off the pet owner’s family.

He claimed he was so irritated by the dog’s constant barking that he threw a stone at the two-year-old Welsh Corgi, resulting in the animal losing consciousness.

“Only after the dog passed out, he claims, he strangled the animal and cooked it,” a detective in the southern city of Pyeongtaek said.

“The man then invited his neighbors to share the meal, including the father of the dog-owning family,” he said.

Dog meat has long been a part of South Korean cuisine. But consumption has declined as South Koreans increasingly embrace the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among younger generations.

The case came to light when a daughter of the family this week published an online plea calling for public support to ensure that the offender be punished sternly. A petition has so far gained almost 15,000 signatures.

“We had been all around the town, handing out leaflets containing the dog’s picture, phone number and rewards of one million won ($940), in order to find the missing dog,” the daughter said by phone, asking for her family’s name to be kept anonymous.

When I reached the man’s house, which is just three doors down from ours, he expressed sympathy, promising to let us know if he found the dog.”

At that time, however, the farmer was hiding the dog, either alive or dead, in his barn, she said.

The following day, the suspect visited her father, drank with him and consoled him over the missing dog.

“He even invited neighbors to come share the dog meat, including my father who did not accept the invitation as he is a non-dog meat eater,” she said.

As many as one million dogs are still consumed in South Korea each year, with the greasy red meat — which is invariably boiled for tenderness — believed to increase energy.

Activists have stepped up campaigns to ban dog consumption. Under a newly strengthened law, animal abusers face up to two years in prison or 20 million won ($18,700) in fines.


Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

Updated 16 November 2018
0

Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

  • The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015
  • ‘The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media’

SYDNEY: Rebel Wilson said she was glad she’d stood up to “a bully” despite losing her bid Friday to keep most of the record payout awarded to her in her defamation case against an Australian magazine.
The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015 that she said had painted her as someone who’d lied about her real name, age and childhood in order to make it in Hollywood.
The Supreme Court of Victoria state awarded her an Australian-record payout of $3.4 million (A$4.7 million) after a jury concluded she’d missed out on film roles because of the articles. Wilson had sought $5 million in damages.
But this June the amount was reduced by 90 percent after the magazine’s publishers, Bauer Media, appealed. Victoria’s Court of Appeal said Wilson could not prove economic loss, or that she’d missed out on film contracts as a result of the articles. The court ordered the actress to pay back almost $3 million, and 80 percent of Bauer’s legal costs.
Wilson’s lawyers on Friday sought leave to appeal against the reduction in the High Court — Australia’s highest judicial body — but the application was refused.
“In our opinion there are insufficient prospects that an appeal will succeed,” Justice Virginia Bell said at the court in the national capital, Canberra.
The magazine publisher welcomed the decision. “Bauer Media is invested in its Australian business now more than ever,” Bauer chief executive Paul Dykzeul said in a statement. “Our audience trust our content and our writers and they love our iconic brands like Woman’s Day and Australian Women’s Weekly.”
Wilson, who sat in the front row of the public gallery during the brief hearing, said outside the court she was glad the process had been brought to an end.
“This has been a long fight and a long journey in the courts, but the great thing about today is that it brings it to a definitive end,” she told reporters.
“The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media.”
Wilson said she was proud of herself for “seeing it out right to the bitter end,” and that she was glad the initial jury had “restored my reputation.”
“Today was just about a small point of special damages and for me it was never about the money, it was about standing up to a bully and I’ve done that.”
Wilson is a native Australian best known for her Hollywood roles in the “Pitch Perfect” films and “Bridesmaids.”