Taiwan grandpa catches ‘em all playing Pokemon Go on 15 phones

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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as "Pokemon grandpa", poses with his bicycle as he plays the mobile game "Pokemon Go" by Nintendo, near his home with 15 mobile phones, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as “Pokemon grandpa,” plays the mobile game “Pokemon Go” by Nintendo, near his home with 15 mobile phones, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as “Pokemon grandpa,” plays the mobile game “Pokemon Go” by Nintendo, near his home with 15 mobile phones, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as "Pokemon grandpa", prepares to play the mobile game "Pokemon Go" by Nintendo with his 15 mobile phones, near his home, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 13 November 2018
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Taiwan grandpa catches ‘em all playing Pokemon Go on 15 phones

  • Attached to the front of his bicycle are 15 mobile phones which Chen, 70, uses to simultaneously play the augmented-reality game Pokemon Go
  • Chen said his gear cost more than $4,800 and he spends about $300 a month on virtual currency to use in the game

TAIPEI: Chen San-yuan turns heads as he cycles through a suburb of Taipei, Taiwan’s capital.
The reason why?
Attached to the front of his bicycle are 15 mobile phones which Chen, 70, uses to simultaneously play the augmented-reality game Pokemon Go.
The smartphone-based game requires players to ‘catch’ animated characters that appear in real locations.
Known as Pokemon Grandpa, videos of Chen and his fan-shaped phone setup cycling between “Pokestops” have gone viral on the Internet and made him a minor celebrity in Tucheng district, where he lives.
“I used one cellphone and then kept playing and playing,” Chen, dressed in a crisp, white long-sleeved shirt and pants, told Reuters Television on a recent outing.
“After a month, it became three cellphones, six cellphones, nine cellphones, 12 and then 15,” he said, crediting his grandson with introducing him to Pokemon Go in 2016.
Chen said his gear cost more than $4,800 and he spends about $300 a month on virtual currency to use in the game.
Playing on multiple phones allows him to get to higher levels in the game more quickly and capture rarer creatures, he said.
The pensioner said he sometimes plays all night thanks to the custom-made portable battery packs that recharge the phones.
Chen’s fellow players are amazed at his energy.
“He’s able to take care of fifteen cellphones at once,” said Shih Wun-sheng, 45. “From going out until returning home, Chen can remain energetic for six to seven hours, not feeling tired. That’s really impressive.”
Pokemon Go, jointly developed by Nintendo Co. and Niantic Inc, has been the biggest hit so far among games using so-called augmented reality, where digital characters are superimposed on the real world.


Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

A handout photograph recieved in London on March 25, 2019, shows the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington's fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation. (AFP)
Updated 26 March 2019
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Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

  • The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park

LONDON: An exhibition on the Duke of Wellington’s time in India opens in London Saturday, shedding light on formative years before he defeated French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.
Between 1796 and 1804, as the young Arthur Wellesley, he helped overthrow the Tipu Sultan and masterminded victory in the Battle of Assaye.
A decade later he defeated Napoleon, paving the way for a century of relative peace in Europe and a time of vast British imperial expansion.
The collection includes a dinner service commemorating his leadership in India that was later supplemented with cutlery taken from Napoleon’s carriage.
It also includes books from the 200-volume traveling library that, aged 27, he took with him for the six-month voyage to India in a bid to broaden his education, having finished his studies early.
It included books on India’s history, politics and economics, Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” and philosophical works.
The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park.
Charles Wellesley, 73, the ninth and current Duke of Wellington, said his great-great-great grandfather’s time in India set the stage for defeating Napoleon.
“It was very, very formative... There is no doubt that he learnt a great deal in India,” he said on Monday.
“Napoleon underestimated Wellington and the reason for this exhibition is to show how important in Wellington’s life was his period in India.”
The exhibition features swords, paintings and the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington’s fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation.
The cutlery for the service was taken from Napoleon after Waterloo and carries his imperial crest.
The service is still used by the family.
Josephine Oxley, keeper of the Wellington Collection, said the India years were “a time when he learned to meld the military and the political, and became skilled at negotiations with the locals.
“It’s a really interesting period of his life.”