Taiwan grandpa catches ‘em all playing Pokemon Go on 15 phones

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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as "Pokemon grandpa", poses with his bicycle as he plays the mobile game "Pokemon Go" by Nintendo, near his home with 15 mobile phones, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as “Pokemon grandpa,” plays the mobile game “Pokemon Go” by Nintendo, near his home with 15 mobile phones, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as “Pokemon grandpa,” plays the mobile game “Pokemon Go” by Nintendo, near his home with 15 mobile phones, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
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Taiwanese Chen San-yuan, 70, known as "Pokemon grandpa", prepares to play the mobile game "Pokemon Go" by Nintendo with his 15 mobile phones, near his home, in New Taipei City, Taiwan November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 13 November 2018

Taiwan grandpa catches ‘em all playing Pokemon Go on 15 phones

  • Attached to the front of his bicycle are 15 mobile phones which Chen, 70, uses to simultaneously play the augmented-reality game Pokemon Go
  • Chen said his gear cost more than $4,800 and he spends about $300 a month on virtual currency to use in the game

TAIPEI: Chen San-yuan turns heads as he cycles through a suburb of Taipei, Taiwan’s capital.
The reason why?
Attached to the front of his bicycle are 15 mobile phones which Chen, 70, uses to simultaneously play the augmented-reality game Pokemon Go.
The smartphone-based game requires players to ‘catch’ animated characters that appear in real locations.
Known as Pokemon Grandpa, videos of Chen and his fan-shaped phone setup cycling between “Pokestops” have gone viral on the Internet and made him a minor celebrity in Tucheng district, where he lives.
“I used one cellphone and then kept playing and playing,” Chen, dressed in a crisp, white long-sleeved shirt and pants, told Reuters Television on a recent outing.
“After a month, it became three cellphones, six cellphones, nine cellphones, 12 and then 15,” he said, crediting his grandson with introducing him to Pokemon Go in 2016.
Chen said his gear cost more than $4,800 and he spends about $300 a month on virtual currency to use in the game.
Playing on multiple phones allows him to get to higher levels in the game more quickly and capture rarer creatures, he said.
The pensioner said he sometimes plays all night thanks to the custom-made portable battery packs that recharge the phones.
Chen’s fellow players are amazed at his energy.
“He’s able to take care of fifteen cellphones at once,” said Shih Wun-sheng, 45. “From going out until returning home, Chen can remain energetic for six to seven hours, not feeling tired. That’s really impressive.”
Pokemon Go, jointly developed by Nintendo Co. and Niantic Inc, has been the biggest hit so far among games using so-called augmented reality, where digital characters are superimposed on the real world.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.