Russia and the origins of terrorism

Russia and the origins of terrorism

At the forefront of discussion in the global community today is the threat of terrorism, from which no part of the world has suffered more than the Middle East. Many wonder why this is the case. The origins of modern-day terrorism were incubated in states that were closely allied with the Soviet Union during the Cold War. A lack of economic output and opportunity created resentment that still exists today.  
Terrorism from Libya in the 1970s and 1980s? It was a Soviet client state. The emergence of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, which resorted to terrorism? From the end of World War II to the middle of former President Anwar Sadat’s regime, Egypt was a model Soviet client state.
Palestinian terrorism in the Middle East and Europe? The Palestine Liberation Organization and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine were both crafted and used as proxies by Soviet intelligence services to provide a Russian presence in the Palestinian movement.
Regarding the emergence of Daesh in Syria and Iraq, both countries were aligned with the Soviets during the Cold War. The grievances of the Sunni community in Syria? Although the French favored the Alawites, it was a Syria allied to the Soviets that made this a more or less permanent state of affairs. Russia today is led by a president who served with great capability in the Soviet intelligence services.
Iran feels confident not only because of its tremendous capabilities in asymmetrical warfare throughout the Middle East, but because Russia helps it with its nuclear program, which threatens to further destabilize the region.
Who helps Tehran overcome international isolation and economic sanctions? Russia. Who helps it with uranium enrichment and ballistic missile capabilities? Russia. Who threatens to send one of the best surface-to-air anti-aircraft systems to protect Iranian nuclear facilities and potential targets? Russia.
Its fingerprints are all over this odious, cancerous plague that is ravaging the Middle East and threatening other regions such as Asia, Europe and North Africa.

Faisal Al-Shammeri is a political analyst. Twitter: @Mr_Alshammeri

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