OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

Updated 01 August 2016
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OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

A new report by the Statistical, Economic and Social Research and Training Centre for Islamic Countries (SESRIC), a subsidiary organ of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), indicate that with over one and a half million new cases of Cancer diagnosed in 2012, OIC countries accounted for 11% of the world and 17% of the developing countries total cancer cases.
The report published in July 2016 provides a detailed analysis on incidence, prevalence and death burden of major cancers in OIC member countries.
Unlike the global trends, the report indicate that women are more likely to have cancer in OIC countries than men.
It is reported that age-standardised incidence of cancer in OIC countries was recorded at 127 per 100,000 population for adults and 128 for both men and women in 2012, which is lower than the world average of 182 per 100,000 populations for both sexes and 205 for men and 165 for women.
The findings of the report also indicate that, with 250 thousand new cases, breast cancer is by far the most prevalent cancer in OIC countries.
The second most prevalent is lung cancer, with 105 thousand, and then cervical cancer, with 90 thousand, colorectum cancer with 85 thousand,
and prostate cancer, with 67 thousand cases.
These top-5 cancers accounted for about 40% of all cases diagnosed in OIC countries in 2012.
According to the report, there are widespread gender-based differences in incidence of the most common cancers across the world.
While some of these differences are hormone-related others are largely because of behaviours like smoking and drinking.
Among men in OIC countries, the report finds that five most common sites of cancer diagnosed in 2012 were lung (23.9% of the total), prostate (17.0%), colorectum (12.2%), liver (10.9%), and bladder (7.3%). These five cancers together accounted for about 72% of incidence among men in OIC countries.
Among women, the five most common sites of cancer were breast (49.9% of the total), cervical (18.0%), colorectum (7.3%), ovary (5.0%), and stomach (2.5%). These five cancers together accounted for around 83% of incidence among women in OIC countries.
The reports states that in absolute numbers, cancers in OIC countries caused about 1.02 million deaths in 2012, accounting for 17.4% of the developing countries and 12% of the global cancer deaths.
With 143 thousand deaths of adult people, lung cancer is by far the deadliest cancer in OIC countries.
The second most deadly is stomach cancer, with 85 thousand deaths, and then breast, with 74 thousand, colorectum cancer, with 64 thousand deaths, and cervical cancer, with 47 thousand deaths.
These top-5 deadliest cancers accounted for about 40% of all deaths caused by cancers in OIC countries in 2012.
In 2013, 39 out of 51 OIC countries (76%) have general availability of breast cancer screening at the primary health care level. Such a ratio
is comparable to the developed countries of 97% and the world average of 85%. A similar trend prevail for the screening for cervical and colon cancer. OIC countries as a group recorded less than one radiotherapy unit available for 100,000 populations in 2013 compared to the averages of other developing countries (1.6) and the world (2.0).
In the light of these findings, the Report offers several policy recommendations to address some of the challenges faced by the member countries in the areas of cancer registry, risk factors, and treatment and medication.


Drifter charged in stabbing death of champ golfer in Iowa

Updated 8 min 43 sec ago
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Drifter charged in stabbing death of champ golfer in Iowa

  • Celia Barquin Arozamena was found in a pond at Coldwater Golf Links in Ames, about 50 kilometers north of Des Moines
  • A police dog tracked Barquin’s scent to a temporary camp along a creek near the golf course, where a suspect was apprehended

AMES, Iowa: A homeless man attacked and killed a top amateur golfer from Spain who was playing a round near her university campus in central Iowa, leaving her body in a pond on the course, police said Tuesday.
Collin Daniel Richards, 22, has been charged with first-degree murder in the death of Celia Barquin Arozamena, a student at Iowa State University.
Barquin was found Monday morning in a pond at Coldwater Golf Links in Ames, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Des Moines. Police were called to the golf course around 10:20 a.m. to investigate a possible missing female after golfers found a golf bag with no one around it.
Officers found Barquin’s body some distance from the bag, with several stab wounds to her upper torso, head and neck, according to the criminal complaint filed Tuesday against Richards.
A police dog tracked Barquin’s scent to a temporary camp along a creek near the golf course, where Richards had been living in a tent, the complaint said. Officers found Richards with several fresh scratches on his face consistent with fighting, and a deep laceration in his left hand that he tried to conceal, it said.
An acquaintance of Richards told investigators that the suspect had said in recent days that he had “an urge to rape and kill a woman” while they were walking on a trail near the course, the complaint said. A second acquaintance told police that Richards arrived at his home on Monday appearing “disheveled and covered in blood, sand and water.” He bathed and left with his clothes in a backpack.
Investigators later recovered two pairs of shorts with blood stains and a knife that Richards allegedly gave to two other people after the slaying, the complaint said. Those two individuals were driving Richards out of town after the slaying, but he asked them to drop him off near the camp so he could get his tent and that’s when officers arrested him, it said.
Barquin was the 2018 Big 12 champion and Iowa State Female Athlete of the Year. The university said the native of Puente San Miguel, Spain, was finishing her civil engineering degree this semester after exhausting her eligibility at Iowa State in 2017-2018.
She was one of the most accomplished players in Cyclone golf history, the university said. In April, she became the second women’s golfer at Iowa State to earn medalist honors at a conference tournament when claiming the 2018 Big 12 Championship. She did it with a three-shot victory.
Barquin, who was ranked No. 69 nationally by Golfweek, ended her career as a Cyclone with a fourth-straight NCAA Regional appearance and earned All-Big 12 Team honors for the third time — the second player in Iowa State’s history to do so.
She became the third Cyclone women’s golfer to compete in the US Women’s Open Championship, the university said. The team announced Tuesday it was pulling out of the East & West Match Play in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to be with friends and family and to grieve their loss.
Iowa State President Wendy Wintersteen said in a statement on Twitter that she was “deeply saddened to learn of the tragic death” of Barquin, describing her as a “dedicated civil engineering student” and an “acclaimed golfer with a bright future.”
Head women’s golf coach Christie Martens said in a release that Barquin was “loved by all her teammates and friends” and was an “outstanding representative of our school.”
“We will never forget her competitive drive to be the best and her passion for life,” Martens said.