OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

Updated 01 August 2016
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OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

A new report by the Statistical, Economic and Social Research and Training Centre for Islamic Countries (SESRIC), a subsidiary organ of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), indicate that with over one and a half million new cases of Cancer diagnosed in 2012, OIC countries accounted for 11% of the world and 17% of the developing countries total cancer cases.
The report published in July 2016 provides a detailed analysis on incidence, prevalence and death burden of major cancers in OIC member countries.
Unlike the global trends, the report indicate that women are more likely to have cancer in OIC countries than men.
It is reported that age-standardised incidence of cancer in OIC countries was recorded at 127 per 100,000 population for adults and 128 for both men and women in 2012, which is lower than the world average of 182 per 100,000 populations for both sexes and 205 for men and 165 for women.
The findings of the report also indicate that, with 250 thousand new cases, breast cancer is by far the most prevalent cancer in OIC countries.
The second most prevalent is lung cancer, with 105 thousand, and then cervical cancer, with 90 thousand, colorectum cancer with 85 thousand,
and prostate cancer, with 67 thousand cases.
These top-5 cancers accounted for about 40% of all cases diagnosed in OIC countries in 2012.
According to the report, there are widespread gender-based differences in incidence of the most common cancers across the world.
While some of these differences are hormone-related others are largely because of behaviours like smoking and drinking.
Among men in OIC countries, the report finds that five most common sites of cancer diagnosed in 2012 were lung (23.9% of the total), prostate (17.0%), colorectum (12.2%), liver (10.9%), and bladder (7.3%). These five cancers together accounted for about 72% of incidence among men in OIC countries.
Among women, the five most common sites of cancer were breast (49.9% of the total), cervical (18.0%), colorectum (7.3%), ovary (5.0%), and stomach (2.5%). These five cancers together accounted for around 83% of incidence among women in OIC countries.
The reports states that in absolute numbers, cancers in OIC countries caused about 1.02 million deaths in 2012, accounting for 17.4% of the developing countries and 12% of the global cancer deaths.
With 143 thousand deaths of adult people, lung cancer is by far the deadliest cancer in OIC countries.
The second most deadly is stomach cancer, with 85 thousand deaths, and then breast, with 74 thousand, colorectum cancer, with 64 thousand deaths, and cervical cancer, with 47 thousand deaths.
These top-5 deadliest cancers accounted for about 40% of all deaths caused by cancers in OIC countries in 2012.
In 2013, 39 out of 51 OIC countries (76%) have general availability of breast cancer screening at the primary health care level. Such a ratio
is comparable to the developed countries of 97% and the world average of 85%. A similar trend prevail for the screening for cervical and colon cancer. OIC countries as a group recorded less than one radiotherapy unit available for 100,000 populations in 2013 compared to the averages of other developing countries (1.6) and the world (2.0).
In the light of these findings, the Report offers several policy recommendations to address some of the challenges faced by the member countries in the areas of cancer registry, risk factors, and treatment and medication.


More than 300 older children split at border are reunited

Julie Schwietert-Collazo, left, of Immigrant Families Together, walks with Rosayra Pablo Cruz, center, as she leaves the Cayuga Center with her sons 5-year-old Fernando, second from left, and 15-year-old Jordy, in this July 13, 2018 photo, in New York. (AP)
Updated 4 min 24 sec ago
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More than 300 older children split at border are reunited

  • The government has identified eight US Immigration and Customs Enforcement locations to reunify children 5 and older, and people have been getting released throughout the Southwest this week
  • The actual reunification process is a logistical nightmare

SAN DIEGO: The Trump administration said Thursday that it has reunified 364 children ages 5 and older with their families after they were separated at the border, still leaving hundreds to go before a court-imposed deadline a week away.
The Justice Department reaffirmed in a court filing that it has identified 2,551 children who may be covered by US District Judge Dana Sabraw’s order. More than 900 are either “not eligible or not yet known to the eligible,” the vast majority of them undergoing evaluation to verify parentage and ensure the children are safe.
ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt said he was concerned about the high number of children who have not been cleared for reunification.
The administration and the American Civil Liberties Union are due back in court Friday for the fifth time in two weeks as the judge holds tightly to a July 26 deadline for all children to be reunified. He set an earlier deadline of July 10 for dozens of children under 5.
The government has identified eight US Immigration and Customs Enforcement locations to reunify children 5 and older, and people have been getting released throughout the Southwest this week.
The US Conference of Catholic Bishops and Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service are taking the lead on helping families that have been released into the US Faith-based groups provide food, clothing, legal aid and often money for a bus or a plane ticket, usually for them to join relatives across the country.
Annunciation House in El Paso, Texas, has served dozens of families. The shelter’s director, Ruben Garcia, said “the actual reunification process is a logistical nightmare.”
On Monday, the judge put a temporary hold on deporting parents while the government prepares a response to the ACLU’s request for parents to have at least one week to decide whether to pursue asylum in the US after they are reunited with their children.