OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

Updated 01 August 2016
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OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

A new report by the Statistical, Economic and Social Research and Training Centre for Islamic Countries (SESRIC), a subsidiary organ of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), indicate that with over one and a half million new cases of Cancer diagnosed in 2012, OIC countries accounted for 11% of the world and 17% of the developing countries total cancer cases.
The report published in July 2016 provides a detailed analysis on incidence, prevalence and death burden of major cancers in OIC member countries.
Unlike the global trends, the report indicate that women are more likely to have cancer in OIC countries than men.
It is reported that age-standardised incidence of cancer in OIC countries was recorded at 127 per 100,000 population for adults and 128 for both men and women in 2012, which is lower than the world average of 182 per 100,000 populations for both sexes and 205 for men and 165 for women.
The findings of the report also indicate that, with 250 thousand new cases, breast cancer is by far the most prevalent cancer in OIC countries.
The second most prevalent is lung cancer, with 105 thousand, and then cervical cancer, with 90 thousand, colorectum cancer with 85 thousand,
and prostate cancer, with 67 thousand cases.
These top-5 cancers accounted for about 40% of all cases diagnosed in OIC countries in 2012.
According to the report, there are widespread gender-based differences in incidence of the most common cancers across the world.
While some of these differences are hormone-related others are largely because of behaviours like smoking and drinking.
Among men in OIC countries, the report finds that five most common sites of cancer diagnosed in 2012 were lung (23.9% of the total), prostate (17.0%), colorectum (12.2%), liver (10.9%), and bladder (7.3%). These five cancers together accounted for about 72% of incidence among men in OIC countries.
Among women, the five most common sites of cancer were breast (49.9% of the total), cervical (18.0%), colorectum (7.3%), ovary (5.0%), and stomach (2.5%). These five cancers together accounted for around 83% of incidence among women in OIC countries.
The reports states that in absolute numbers, cancers in OIC countries caused about 1.02 million deaths in 2012, accounting for 17.4% of the developing countries and 12% of the global cancer deaths.
With 143 thousand deaths of adult people, lung cancer is by far the deadliest cancer in OIC countries.
The second most deadly is stomach cancer, with 85 thousand deaths, and then breast, with 74 thousand, colorectum cancer, with 64 thousand deaths, and cervical cancer, with 47 thousand deaths.
These top-5 deadliest cancers accounted for about 40% of all deaths caused by cancers in OIC countries in 2012.
In 2013, 39 out of 51 OIC countries (76%) have general availability of breast cancer screening at the primary health care level. Such a ratio
is comparable to the developed countries of 97% and the world average of 85%. A similar trend prevail for the screening for cervical and colon cancer. OIC countries as a group recorded less than one radiotherapy unit available for 100,000 populations in 2013 compared to the averages of other developing countries (1.6) and the world (2.0).
In the light of these findings, the Report offers several policy recommendations to address some of the challenges faced by the member countries in the areas of cancer registry, risk factors, and treatment and medication.


Sri Lanka needs hangmen after resuming capital punishment

Sri Lanka's President Maithripala Sirisena. (REUTERS)
Updated 16 February 2019
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Sri Lanka needs hangmen after resuming capital punishment

  • The president believes that punishment by state execution is the best way to combat the country’s drugs crisis

COLOMBO: The Sri Lankan government is on the hunt for executioners following its decision to bring back capital punishment.
A job advertisement published in the country’s state-run newspaper is seeking two people of “very good mind and mental strength” to fill the newly created posts.
The move follows President Maithripala Sirisena’s decision to reinstate the death penalty within the next two months.
According to the advert, published on behalf of Sri Lanka’s Department of Prisons, the ideal candidates need to be aged between 18 and 45 with a basic education.
And the successful applicants will earn a generous $290 per month, an amount well above average for a public sector job in the country.
Sri Lanka’s prisons spokesman, Thushara Upuldeniya, told Arab News that his department had placed the advertisement on Feb. 11 but had not yet received any applications. The final date for applying for the executioner posts is Feb. 25.
Upuldeniya said that any applicants selected will have to undergo a viva voce test (oral examination).

“In addition to mental strength, the personality and physical strength of the applicant will also be taken into consideration,” he added.
During an address to the Sri Lankan Parliament last week, Sirisena said that those convicted of drug-related offenses will be the first to be sent to the gallows.
The president believes that punishment by state execution is the best way to combat the country’s drugs crisis. Sirisena’s decision is seen by some as mirroring Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte’s approach to crime, and could lead to 25 people, including two drug dealers, facing execution.
A list of detainees convicted of drug-related crimes was handed to Sri Lanka’s Presidential Secretariat on Jan. 25. There are an additional 436 people, including six women, on death row for crimes including murder.
A predominantly Buddhist country, Sri Lanka voted in favor of a UN resolution for a moratorium on the death penalty in 2015.
Sri Lanka’s judiciary imposes capital punishment, but the death penalty has not been implemented since June 23, 1976. The government reinstated the punishment for killings, rape, and drug trafficking in 2004 following the murder of a high court judge.
At present two jails in the country, Welikada and Bogambara, are equipped to carry out capital punishment whenever a presidential order is received.
However, finding the right people for the job of executioner seems an uphill task, at least for now.
After searching for an executioner for three years, Sri Lanka’s prison department appointed a hangman in 2014. He was given a week’s training, but on seeing the gallows for the first time, became distressed and immediately resigned.
Meanwhile, an official told Arab News that a new noose is being imported, as the current one had served its time.
The Sri Lanka Standards Institution said it had already requested the Foreign Ministry to order a noose from Singapore, Malaysia, Pakistan, Bangladesh or India. The previous one was gifted by Pakistan in 2015.