OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

Updated 01 August 2016
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OIC countries account for 11% of the world cancer cases

A new report by the Statistical, Economic and Social Research and Training Centre for Islamic Countries (SESRIC), a subsidiary organ of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), indicate that with over one and a half million new cases of Cancer diagnosed in 2012, OIC countries accounted for 11% of the world and 17% of the developing countries total cancer cases.
The report published in July 2016 provides a detailed analysis on incidence, prevalence and death burden of major cancers in OIC member countries.
Unlike the global trends, the report indicate that women are more likely to have cancer in OIC countries than men.
It is reported that age-standardised incidence of cancer in OIC countries was recorded at 127 per 100,000 population for adults and 128 for both men and women in 2012, which is lower than the world average of 182 per 100,000 populations for both sexes and 205 for men and 165 for women.
The findings of the report also indicate that, with 250 thousand new cases, breast cancer is by far the most prevalent cancer in OIC countries.
The second most prevalent is lung cancer, with 105 thousand, and then cervical cancer, with 90 thousand, colorectum cancer with 85 thousand,
and prostate cancer, with 67 thousand cases.
These top-5 cancers accounted for about 40% of all cases diagnosed in OIC countries in 2012.
According to the report, there are widespread gender-based differences in incidence of the most common cancers across the world.
While some of these differences are hormone-related others are largely because of behaviours like smoking and drinking.
Among men in OIC countries, the report finds that five most common sites of cancer diagnosed in 2012 were lung (23.9% of the total), prostate (17.0%), colorectum (12.2%), liver (10.9%), and bladder (7.3%). These five cancers together accounted for about 72% of incidence among men in OIC countries.
Among women, the five most common sites of cancer were breast (49.9% of the total), cervical (18.0%), colorectum (7.3%), ovary (5.0%), and stomach (2.5%). These five cancers together accounted for around 83% of incidence among women in OIC countries.
The reports states that in absolute numbers, cancers in OIC countries caused about 1.02 million deaths in 2012, accounting for 17.4% of the developing countries and 12% of the global cancer deaths.
With 143 thousand deaths of adult people, lung cancer is by far the deadliest cancer in OIC countries.
The second most deadly is stomach cancer, with 85 thousand deaths, and then breast, with 74 thousand, colorectum cancer, with 64 thousand deaths, and cervical cancer, with 47 thousand deaths.
These top-5 deadliest cancers accounted for about 40% of all deaths caused by cancers in OIC countries in 2012.
In 2013, 39 out of 51 OIC countries (76%) have general availability of breast cancer screening at the primary health care level. Such a ratio
is comparable to the developed countries of 97% and the world average of 85%. A similar trend prevail for the screening for cervical and colon cancer. OIC countries as a group recorded less than one radiotherapy unit available for 100,000 populations in 2013 compared to the averages of other developing countries (1.6) and the world (2.0).
In the light of these findings, the Report offers several policy recommendations to address some of the challenges faced by the member countries in the areas of cancer registry, risk factors, and treatment and medication.


’We’ll come back for you’: US fires split families, pets

Updated 18 November 2018
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’We’ll come back for you’: US fires split families, pets

  • Many animals arrived at the shelters injured and burned
  • The animal shelters are working with dozens of volunteers responsible for feeding, caring for and walking the animals

CHICO, United States: Steve Cox pets and cuddles Ernie, his 10-year-old English bulldog, before leaving him at a shelter. Cox lost his home in California’s devastating wildfires, and now they have to part.
“Don’t you worry Ernie. I am not gonna let you down. We’ll come back for you,” Cox whispers.
He has been staying at a hotel but it doesn’t take pets. For a week, Cox tried to take care of Ernie in the back of his pickup truck.
But now, as Cox tries to get his life back on track, he thinks Ernie would get better care at one of three animal shelters in northern California’s Paradise area where the so-called Camp Fire has claimed 76 lives and left more than 1,000 unaccounted for.
In this rural area, which had many horses, one shelter is for large animals.
Then there are two small facilities where helpers are working with dogs, cats, chickens, rabbits, turtles and even swans.
Ernie is walking with a bit of trouble after an operation on an abscess in one of his front legs. Cox says the dog is lazy, though, so he thinks Ernie will adapt quickly to the separation by sleeping a lot.
The main shelter was set up in the city of Chico’s airport, near Paradise, where rescue and firefighting operations have been based.
Animals saved by firefighters are dropped off there to be cared for.
One woman arrives desperate, her hands trembling. She pulls out an envelope of photos of her cats and dogs.
“Please, let me in and see. I might find them,” she begs in a tearful voice.
When the fire began to threaten Paradise, Cox was headed home from the doctor with his wife. He could have stopped but instead kept going, to rescue Ernie and two other smaller dogs he has.
“They are family. I couldn’t just leave them. We had 10 minutes to leave,” he recalls.
Cox, who lived there since 1973, said he lost two houses, and many pieces of furniture that his father had left him, in the blaze which virtually wiped the entire community from the map.
“I have a big question mark above my head. I don’t know what I’ll do,” he says, his face showing exhaustion.
The animal shelters are working with dozens of volunteers responsible for feeding, caring for and walking the animals.
They also have volunteer veterinary technicians, including Marshall Riddle, who are responsible for treating them.
Many animals arrived at the shelters injured and burned.
“It’s never easy, but we have to make sure every animal is safe,” he says.
The most worrying cases were sent along to specialized clinics.
Although these are not the first shelters of their kind in the state regularly ravaged by wildfires, the blazes have never been so deadly.
“Butte County is always on fire,” said Karen Falconer of the North Valley Animal Disaster Group, which runs another of the shelters, in an old hospital in the town of Oroville.
There are about 430 animals, separated into zones. The dog section is barking noisily but the cat zone is quieter.
“We’ll take care of them as long as necessary,” Falconer told AFP.
For Cox, the separation was just starting, while others were already rejoicing in reunion.
Little Eva’s face lit up when her six-month-old kitten Luke Skywalker — named for the “Star Wars” character — was handed over to her and her parents, Robert Pieper and his wife Brittany.
They had already searched in another shelter for their pet African tortoise named James Peterson.
The fire destroyed their house in Magalia, just outside Paradise.
Now, after days in a shelter and then a hotel, they were able to rent an apartment where they could be with their pets and try to start over the life the wildfires had burnt beyond recognition.