Egypt court gives 8 Brotherhood leaders life sentences

Updated 31 August 2014

Egypt court gives 8 Brotherhood leaders life sentences

CAIRO: An Egyptian court sentenced Muslim Brotherhood spiritual leader Mohammed Badie and seven others to life in prison Saturday on charges of planning riots, murder and sabotage, state news agency MENA reported.
The case stems from violence that took place last summer after the ouster of Islamist President Muhammad Mursi, when fighting killed 10 people and injured 20.
Presiding judge Mohammed Nagi Shehata also sentenced six Islamists to death in absentia. Under Egyptian law, they will face a retrial once in custody.
Prosecutors charged the defendants with using force and carrying weapons while gathering in several marches around the Istiqama mosque in Giza, Cairo’s twin city. They also were charged with vandalizing public property, setting two security installations on fire and terrorizing citizens.
After Mursi was overthrown, authorities launched a sweeping crackdown on his supporters, killing hundreds of people and detaining tens of thousands, including many senior Brotherhood members. The government designated the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group late last year, though the group says it does not use violence to advance its goals.
Badie has been sentenced to death and to life in prison in two other cases but can still appeal.


Turkey says ready to send troops to back Libya unity govt

Updated 37 min 46 sec ago

Turkey says ready to send troops to back Libya unity govt

ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday he was ready to send troops to Libya if requested by the internationally recognised government in Tripoli.
"On the issue of sending soldiers... If Libya makes such a request from us, we can send our personnel there, especially after striking the military security agreement," he said in a televised appearance.
Turkey signed a military agreement last month with Libya's Government of National Accord, led by Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj.
It came after media reports that Russia had sent 200 mercenaries to support Libya's military strongman Khalifa Haftar, who is seeking to unseat the Tripoli-based government.
Russia has denied the reports, but Erdogan said: "There is a security company from Russia (in Libya) called Wagner. This company sent its security staff there."
The Wagner Group is a shadowy private security firm and thousands of its security contractors are believed to be in foreign conflicts from Syria to Ukraine to the Central African Republic.
At the same time as the military deal, Turkey also signed a controversial maritime jurisdiction agreement with Sarraj, giving sweeping rights for Turkey to explore for oil in the Mediterranean.
"With the new line drawn (by the maritime agreement), we will take steps to protect the interests of Libya, Turkey and the TRNC (Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus). This is in line with international law," he said.
The deal has been staunchly opposed by Greece, Cyprus and their European partners which says it violates the islands' maritime rights.