G20 officials decry lack of global growth

Updated 21 April 2013

G20 officials decry lack of global growth

WASHINGTON: World finance leaders say they are determined to attack a sluggish global economy in which growth is too weak and unemployment too high. Their problem is arriving at a consensus over the proper mix of policies.
Finance ministers and central bank presidents from the world’s biggest economies issued a joint statement that papered over stark differences between opposing views.
The US and other countries are pushing for less budget austerity and more government stimulus while Germany and others contend that attacking huge budget deficits should be job No. 1.
The discussions were scheduled to wrap up yesterday with meetings of the steering committees of the 188-nation International Monetary Fund and its sister lending agency, the World Bank.
Finance Minster Ibrahim Al-Assaf was leading the Saudi delegation at the G20 and IMF/World Bank meetings in Washington.
On the sidelines of the sessions, he held separate bilateral talks with British Finance Minister George Osborne, Tunisian Development and International Cooperation Minister Al-Ameen Al-Daghri, Pakistan’s Finance Minister Shahid Amjad and Sri Lankan Finance Minister Sarath Amunugama, Zambian Finance Ministe Minister Alexander Shekotada.
The G-20 joint statement revealed no major new policy initiatives and sought to straddle the divide in the growth-and- austerity argument.
The US is being represented at the talks by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew and US Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke.
“Strengthening global demand is imperative and must be at the top of our agenda,” Lew said in remarks before the IMF policy-setting group. “Stronger demand in Europe is critical to global growth.”
However, other nations, led by Germany, have resisted a move away from austerity programs, saying it is critical to keep making progress in getting government deficits under control.
German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble apologized to a Washington audience for being late for a speech after the G-20 discussions, saying, “On reduction of indebtedness ... we have a little bit of differences of opinion all over the world, to be very frank, and that’s the reason I am a little bit late.”
Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head of the Eurogroup, encompassing the 17 finance ministers whose countries use the euro currency, said that European nations needed to keep pushing to reduce huge budget deficits but “we can and will adjust” the speed that the deficit cuts are implemented to take into account economic conditions.
The G-20 joint statement singled out the recent aggressive credit-easing moves pushed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, saying they were intended to stop prolonged deflation and support domestic demand.
Those comments were viewed as giving a green light to Japan’s program, which has driven the value of the yen down by more than 20 percent against the dollar since October. That sizable decline has raised concerns among US manufacturing companies that Japan’s real goal is not to fight deflation, a destabilizing period of falling prices, but to weaken the yen as a way to gain trade advantages.
To address those concerns, the G20 did repeat language it used in February that all countries should not use their currency as a trade weapon and guard against policies that could trigger currency wars.
Japanese officials told reporters following the discussions that they were pleased by the support the G20 had given them to pursue growth policies in an effort to lift the world’s third-largest economy out of its two-decade slump.
Haruhiko Kuroda, head of the Bank of Japan, said: “There has been international understanding and acceptance of this, so we can have further confidence to appropriately conduct monetary policy.”
The G-20 statement also said that there was an urgent need for the 17-nation euro currency area to move toward a banking union and reduce the “financial fragmentation” that now exists.
The communique said that “more needs to be done to address the issues of international tax avoidance and evasion in particular through havens.”
The financial crisis that hit the Mediterranean island of Cyprus earlier this year revived concern over countries that serve as tax havens.
In Cyprus, banks held more than $ 162 billion in assets, or roughly seven times the country’s total GDP. Much of that money came from wealthy Russian investors.


American Airlines threatens to cancel some Boeing 737 MAX orders

Updated 11 July 2020

American Airlines threatens to cancel some Boeing 737 MAX orders

  • American’s stand comes as airlines are finding financing increasingly difficult and expensive
  • Airlines have canceled orders for more than 400 MAX planes so far this year

DALLAS: American Airlines is warning Boeing that it could cancel some overdue orders for the grounded 737 MAX unless the plane maker helps line up new financing for the jets, according to people familiar with the discussions.
American’s stand comes as airlines are finding financing increasingly difficult and expensive as the coronavirus pandemic has crippled their operations.
American had 24 MAX jets before they were grounded in March 2019. It has orders for 76 more but wants Boeing to help arrange financing for 17 planes for which previous financing has or will soon expire, according to three people who spoke Friday on condition of anonymity to discuss private talks between the companies.
If the companies can’t reach an agreement, American could use MAX financing that is about to expire to pay for jets from Boeing’s archrival Airbus, one of the people said.
Chicago-based Boeing said in a statement that it is working with customers during “an unprecedented time for our industry as airlines confront a steep drop in traffic,” but did not comment on the talks with American. The Fort Worth, Texas-based airline declined to comment.
News of American’s threat to cancel some orders was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.
The situation underscores the strain facing airlines during the coronavirus pandemic. It has grown more difficult and expensive for them to finance planes. American’s negotiating stance doesn’t reflect a loss of confidence in the plane’s safety, the sources said.
The MAX was Boeing’s best-selling plane before crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people and led regulators around the world to ground all MAX jets.
The coronavirus pandemic has compounded Boeing’s problems by causing a sharp drop in air travel and a loss of interest in new planes. Nearly 40 percent of the world’s passenger jets are idled, according to aviation data supplier Cirium, as most airlines have more planes than they need until travel recovers.
That has made it more difficult to finance planes. United Airlines and Southwest Airlines found foreign lenders who agreed in April and May to buy MAX jets and lease them to the airlines, but those carriers are in stronger financial situations than American.
The 17 planes in dispute were supposed to have been delivered to American at least a year ago. That has given the airline the option of canceling the order without penalty and recovering its down payments now, according to one of the people familiar with the matter. The deliveries have been delayed while Boeing works to fix a flight-control system suspected of playing a role in the crashes.
Airlines have canceled orders for more than 400 MAX planes so far this year, and 320 are no longer certain enough to count in Boeing’s backlog. Some were dropped because the airline buyer ran into financial problems, while others were swapped for different Boeing planes. The company had taken 4,619 orders through May.
Air travel in the US fell about 95 percent from the beginning of March until mid-April. Traffic has recovered slightly since then, but remains down more than 70 percent from a year ago. With little revenue coming in, airlines are slashing spending and preparing to furlough thousands of workers this fall.
American has accepted $5.8 billion in federal aid to pay workers through Sept. 30, reached tentative agreement on a $4.75 billion federal loan, and lined up billions more in available cash from private lenders to survive the travel downturn.