‘Zamzam is best water on earth’

Updated 23 July 2013

‘Zamzam is best water on earth’

Makkah’s Zamzam Well has the best drinking water on the face of the earth. Pilgrims at the Grand Mosque make sure they drink as much as possible and buy containers to take home to friends and family.
There is abundant Zamzam water despite huge consumption by Haj and Umrah pilgrims over the years.
The water was a gift from Allah to Prophet Ismail, peace be upon them, when he cried of thirst as his mother Hajar looked for water by running between the hillocks of Safa and Marwa.
She did this until Allah, in His graciousness, ensured that water started gushing out from under his feet, and Hajar started moving the sand to protect the water, saying “Zamzam, Zamzam, Zamzam, Zamzam,” according to a report carried by the Saudi Press Agency.
Since then, it has become a tradition to protect the well, to ensure it continues to supply residents, pilgrims and visitors.
This is the function today of the project set up by Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah in the Kadi area in Makkah.
The project provides 5,000 cubic meters of Zamzam water and 200,000 plastic 10-liter containers on a daily basis.
The plant was built at a cost of SR 700 million in Ramadan 2010 and has 42 distribution points running from its headquarters. As a result, Zamzam water containers are available on a 24-hour basis.
The project’s state-of-the-art system can produce up to 5 million liters of water through a linear filter.
It has a principal storage tank with a capacity of 10 million liters, with four pumps to the Grand Mosque's square through a 200 mm stainless steel line.
The production factory was built on 13,405 square meters and consists of several buildings with air compressors, a warehouse and production lines.
It has 10MW electrical generators and works on the SCAD system, which allows for control and monitoring of all phases of the project including pumping water from the well and packaging.
The project also has a central warehouse with air conditioning and warning and fire systems worth SR 75 million. There are 15 levels of storage and distribution of 1.5 million 10-liter containers. The factory is linked through lines and bridges to ensure easier production and distribution between buildings.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 48 min 7 sec ago

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.