Students opt for non-traditional professions in choosing careers

Students opt for non-traditional professions in choosing careers
Updated 08 September 2013

Students opt for non-traditional professions in choosing careers

Students opt for non-traditional professions in choosing careers

Students are increasingly opting for more vocational courses and professions that were previously deemed unpopular or unacademic.
Although students are still graduating in dated professions such as math, science, business or engineering, very few are able to find jobs in their chosen professions, so they look for alternative careers they are able to enter into.
As such, students are no longer choosing traditional degree courses such as medicine and engineering. Instead, they are opting for “softer” vocations such as hotel management, fashion design and photography.
Najwa Rahman, an education counselor, said, “The most popular careers lie in the liberal arts programs.”
“Students are looking for newer options and steering clear of traditional career options,” she added.
Fashion design student Sumaiya said, “New study options offer students a myriad of job opportunities and greater areas of proficiencies.”
She added that most of the girls in the Kingdom have embarked on entrepreneurial activities by starting their own fashion boutique and are pursuing a career in fashion design.
Rahwa Malik, also a fashion designer, said, “I chose to be a fashion designer to break away from routine career traps. I now work online and design customized dresses. I showcase my work and attract local, as well as international, buyers through social media.”
Several amateurs are now self-employed, taking advantage of online opportunities.
Some youths have taken up photography as a profession within the Kingdom.
The dawn of the digital camera and the awareness generated by the Internet about the potential of photography are among the main motivating factors for the growing admiration toward the subject. “Digital cameras have made photography simple and within the reach of the average individual,” said Nazeer Mohammed, a photographer and a graphic designer.
“I used to spend my free time clicking on random pictures. I later decided to pursue it professionally and I now work as a freelancer,” says Asma Fuzail, a Jeddah-based photographer. “I chose this field not for money but for the love of photography,” she added.
The increased awareness about the art of photography in the Kingdom has lured several amateur photographers to work as freelancers in the field of advertising and in design companies and media houses. “Many local brands and companies demand attractive brochures and catalogs for which they need quality commercial photographers,” said Pierre, a human resources consultant.
Many young photographers who first start off as amateurs go on to pursue their hobby as a profession, which later helps them to take up projects almost single-handedly. “I have bought myself a DSLR camera. I surf online for tips on how to take the best pictures during my free time and I am planning to take a proper course at a university to hone my skills,” said Abdullah Hashim, an IT student.
Many other youngsters have started building a portfolio on sites to attract people to hire them professionally. Several local universities in the Kingdom are offering programs for students interested in pursuing a career in photography, fashion and many other areas.