Politics of protest

Politics of protest
Updated 24 May 2014

Politics of protest

Politics of protest

I fully agree with the views expressed by Muhammad Waqas in his article “Politics of protest will not help Pakistan” (May 24). The writer has highlighted an important issue. It is true that in a democracy, everyone has the right to assemble at any given place and to voice their anger over government’s policies in a civilized manner. Unfortunately, in our part of the world protests don’t remain peaceful thus tantamount to abusing democratic rights. I agree with the writer that such protest drives will not help Pakistan in any way. The chief of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaaf (PTI), Imran Khan, should raise his voice at the appropriate forum. He should not forget that his party is heading a government in a province. What is the use of these protests then?
I don’t wish to comment on Dr. Tahirul Qadri, his ways of doing things are already debatable. Observers may recall the famous Qadri-led sit-in during which he had demanded of the then PPP-led government to resign. It was nothing but a waste of time and resources. Pakistani leaders should not indulge in such practices. Nobody is asking them to forego their right to protest or oppose, but they should understand that Pakistan is passing through tough times. If our leaders see any problem, they should come up with effective solutions. Instead they create other more problems. The PTI chief had emerged as a ray of hope but the manner in which he is carrying out business has disappointed many. The PTI-led Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government should present a model of good governance so that in the next elections, people from other provinces would vote for the party. The PTI has the potential to become a strong political force. It should not act like the traditional parties. — Lala, Jeddah