Interior Ministry to hold cyber security conference on Feb. 27

Updated 01 February 2017

Interior Ministry to hold cyber security conference on Feb. 27

RIYADH: The Ministry of Interior, represented by the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC), will organize the Second Annual International Security Conference Feb. 27-28 at the Security Forces Officers Club here.
Abbad Alabbad, NCSC communication and strategic development executive director, said that the conference is one the largest of its kind in the region that addresses cyber security in different ways. About 600 participants are expected to attend.
“One major objective is to bring cyber knowledge and experience all over the world to information technology (IT) professionals in the Kingdom and the region,” Alabbad told Arab News.
He added that the conference will also “facilitate national, regional and international collaboration between government, industry and critical infrastructure organizations.”
The conference will also feature investors who want to diversify their portfolio into international companies, particularly in the field of cyber security sectors where innovation could benefit the regional cyberdefense capacity.
Nicholas Watson, managing director of Naseb, which helps partner investors and companies, said in a statement that “effective information and knowledge sharing within and across industries is crucial to help mitigate cyber threats and attacks.”
Khalil Aljehani, a lawyer in the Saudi capital, said there has been a widespread use of technology that heightens the risk of cyber security threats from hackers and organized criminals.
He added that enhancing the nation’s cyber security infrastructure to combat these threats, develop relevant standards and policies, share and disseminate critical information and educating key stakeholders have become a priority.
Leading solution providers will be holding private meetings with the attendees. Representatives include STC, Spire Solutions, Raytheon, SecurityMatterz, Advanced Electronics Company, Attivo Networks, BT, Fortinet, Innovative Solutions, Kapersky, Nortyhrop Grumman, PhisMe, Darktrace, Paloalto Networks, Protection Group International, Symantec, and VirtualForge.


Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

Updated 15 September 2019

Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

  • The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen
  • ‘Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors’

BAGHDAD: Baghdad on Sunday denied any link to drone attacks on Saudi oil plants, after media speculation that the strikes were launched from Iraq despite being claimed by Yemeni rebels.
The attacks early Saturday targeted two key oil installations, causing massive fires and taking out half of the kingdom’s vast oil output.
The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war.
But the Wall Street Journal has reported that officials were investigating the possibility the attacks involved missiles launched from Iraq or Iran.
Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi on Sunday denied reports Iraqi territory “was used for drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities.”
“Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors,” he said in a statement.
“The Iraqi government will be extremely firm with whomever tries to violate the constitution.”
Iraq is home to several Iran-backed militias and paramilitary factions, placing it in an awkward situation amid rising tensions between its two main sponsors, Tehran and Washington.
United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo squarely accused Tehran of being behind Saturday’s operation, saying there was no evidence the “unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” was launched from Yemen.
Iraq has called for its territory to be spared any spillover in the standoff between the US and Iran, which has included a series of attacks on shipping in sensitive Gulf waters.
Recent raids on bases belonging to Iraqi Shiite paramilitary groups linked with Iran, attributed to Israel, sparked fears of an escalation.
There have been no military consequences so far, but the strikes have heightened divisions between pro-Tehran and pro-Washington factions in Iraq’s political class.
Baghdad has recently moved to repair ties with Saudi Arabia, a key US ally — much to Iran’s chagrin.
Riyadh recently announced a major border post on the Iraqi frontier would reopen mid-October, after being closed for almost three decades.