Dubai Sikh temple breaks world record for most diverse breakfast party

The temple has held many events for the local community in the past. (Photo courtesy: gurudwaradubai.com)
Updated 14 April 2017

Dubai Sikh temple breaks world record for most diverse breakfast party

DUBAI: A Sikh temple in Dubai on Thursday broke the world record for serving breakfast to the maximum number of people from diverse nationalities.
The temple was awarded a Guinness World Record after serving 600 people from 101 countries an hour-long continental breakfast.
The temple broke the previous record of 55 nationalities sharing a continental breakfast, organized by Nutella at the Milan Expo in Italy in 2015.
The Khaleej Times reported that schoolchildren, government officials and diplomats attended the event while Indian Ambassador to the UAE Navdeep Singh Suri was the chief guest.
“Sikhism has always embraced diversity as it has been part of our faith and belief, that we are all human beings to be treated with respect. The Gurudwara has been spearheading charity and volunteer work not only for the Indian community but for the entire UAE community as well. We feel blessed to give in any form, as this is our selfless service to the society,” Surender Kandhari, chairman of the Gurudwara Guru-nanak Darbar temple, told the Khaleej Times.
Talal Omar, Guinness World Records MENA manager, said: “We are proud to support the Gurudwara Gurunanak Darbar in breaking a fantastic record that brings together people of multi-faiths. We encourage record breaking activities that encourage all human efforts, particularly those that bring people together.”


Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

Updated 13 November 2019

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

ATHENS, Greece: An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.
Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 6th century B.C. pottery vessel was considered lost for decades until research in 2014 by archaeologist Giorgos Kavvadias identified it in the University of Muenster’s collections.
A ministry statement says it was proved “beyond any doubt” that the two-handled cup painted with ancient runners was the one given to Spiros Louis, the Greek marathon victor in 1896.
Following correspondence with Greek officials, the university agreed to return the cup, which was part of a private German collection it had bought in 1986.
The vessel was presented at a ceremony Wednesday at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.