World's most expensive player marks fasting month by giving thanks to Allah

Paul Pogba of Manchester United performs Umrah in Makkah on Sunday. (Instagram photo)
Updated 28 May 2017
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World's most expensive player marks fasting month by giving thanks to Allah

JEDDAH: French player Paul Pogba, Manchester United’s star footballer, is visiting Saudi Arabia during the holy month of Ramadan to perform Umrah. He arrived on Saturday, just three days after lifting Manchester to a Europa League victory over AFC Ajax in Stockholm.
Millions of Muslims observe Ramadan with intense prayer, Duaa, fasting and good deeds. The holy month last for about a month and is followed by the festive Eid celebrations.
Pogba posted a video on Instagram of him twirling his luggage outside his home in Manchester, telling his followers: “on my way to go say thank you for this season. See you soon Manchester! En route to my prayers.”
The 24-year-old Muslim was praising Allah in Makkah in a video that went viral on his Facebook page and Instagram account, where he was performing Umrah wearing ihram while (Tarawih) in prayer.
Tarawih refers to extra prayers performed by Sunni Muslims at night during Ramadan.
He commented below his Instagram post, “Ramadan Kareem, Bon Ramadan #makkah #blessed.”
This was not his first time to visit Makkah. He had previously performed Haj. Haj is the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Makkah.
Some of Umrah performers were lucky enough to spot him in the crowd and stopped to take selfies with him.
Many people reacted positively to his posts on social media because he was a celebrity not only focusing on the worldly wealth, but who also remains aware of his religious duties as a Muslim.
Internationally, at under-20 level, he captained his nation to victory at the 2013 FIFA World Cup and took home the Best Player award for his performances during the tournament.
He made his debut for the senior French national team in 2013 in a 3–1 win against Georgia, and scored his first World Cup goal on June 30, 2014, against Nigeria.


KSRelief chief presented with 2019 moderation award

Updated 50 min 53 sec ago

KSRelief chief presented with 2019 moderation award

MAKKAH: The general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, has been named the winner of the 2019 moderation award.

Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal made the announcement at a ceremony held on Wednesday in Jeddah.

The award, in its third year, is considered one of the most important in promoting the values of moderation and combating extremism, both internally and externally.

Al-Rabeeah has held 13 positions that contributed to his selection for the award, most notably minister of health, and pediatric surgery consultant, a role in which he performed 47 operations for conjoined twins from 20 countries.

The Saudi National Siamese Twins Separation Program is a global reference and one of Saudi Arabia’s most distinguished medical humanitarian initiatives worldwide.

In December 1990, Al-Rabeeah hit local and international headlines after making history in the Kingdom by performing complex surgery to separate the first conjoined Saudi twins at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center in Riyadh.

Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah

The case of the conjoined Malaysian twins Ahmed and Mohammed was particularly demanding. The family of the two children appealed to the Kingdom’s government to conduct the separation operation, and Al-Rabeeah carried out successful surgery lasting 23.5 hours in September 2002, by royal request.

After taking over as general supervisor of KSRelief, Al-Rabeeah oversaw 176 projects in 37 countries, including key areas such as food security, health, water, sanitation, education, women, children, vaccination and shelter.

He also implemented the directives of King Salman, providing various humanitarian and relief programs and building partnerships and community support with other countries.

The center executed 1,050 projects in 44 countries in addition to 225 projects dedicated to women and 224 for children.