1 killed, 1 missing in explosion at Minnesota school

A Minneapolis police officer puts up police tape following an explosion at Minnehaha Academy on Wednesday, in Minneapolis. (AP)
Updated 03 August 2017

1 killed, 1 missing in explosion at Minnesota school

MINNEAPOLIS: Authorities say one person is dead and another is missing after a natural gas explosion at a college prep school in Minneapolis.
Fire Chief John Fruetel says the body was found Wednesday after the explosion caused a partial building collapse at Minnehaha Academy. The private Christian school serves students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.
Fruetel says the dead and missing include one school staff member and one contractor, but he didn’t specify who was found dead.
The Minneapolis Fire Department says the blast was caused by natural gas, and contractors were working on the building at the time.
Authorities say seven adults are hospitalized, including three with critical injuries.
Fire crews have spent hours searching through the rubble.

Authorities say seven adults are hospitalized following a gas explosion that leveled part of a school in Minneapolis.
Hennepin County Medical Center says three patients suffered critical injuries in the explosion Wednesday at Minnehaha Academy.
The hospital’s chief of emergency medicine, Dr. Jim Miner, says the injuries range from head injuries and broken bones to cuts from debris.
Minnehaha Academy says all of its students and staff members are accounted for and safe. The private Christian school serves students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.
Local fire officials say the explosion was caused by natural gas, and contractors were working on the building at the time of the blast.

School officials say all students and staff are safe following an explosion at a private college prep school in Minneapolis, though authorities say two people remain unaccounted for.
The Minneapolis Fire Department says a gas explosion caused the blast and partial building collapse Wednesday at Minnehaha Academy. Fire officials say contractors were working on the building at the time.
Assistant Fire Chief Bryan Tyner says two people are unaccounted for and one person suffered critical injuries in the blast.
The school released a statement saying all of its summer program students and staff “are accounted for and safe.”
The private Christian school serves students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.

Fire officials say a gas explosion caused a fire and partial building collapse at a college prep school in Minneapolis.
The explosion was reported Wednesday at Minnehaha Academy, a private Christian school serving students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.
Assistant Fire Chief Bryan Tyner says two people are unaccounted for and one person suffered critical injuries in the blast. Fire officials say contractors were working on the building at the time.
The Star Tribune reports city records show that Master Mechanical Inc. was issued a permit on June 7 for gas piping and hooking up a meter at the school.
A company official released a statement saying it was monitoring the situation and referring all questions to the Minneapolis Fire Department. He wouldn’t confirm to The Associated Press that company workers were on site, saying: “We are trying to figure it out.”

Authorities say two people are unaccounted for after an explosion and partial building collapse at a grade school in Minneapolis.
The Minneapolis Fire Department initially tweeted that one fatality was reported in the collapse at Minnehaha Academy. But fire officials haven’t been able to confirm that report, and Assistant Fire Chief Bryan Tyner says officials are backing off that statement.
Tyner says three people were rescued from the roof, and another person initially believed missing was found unhurt. He says crews are searching for two missing people who may be trapped in the rubble.
Police say five people were taken to a hospital with injuries, including one who has since been released.
Minnehaha Academy is a Christian college prep school, serving students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.

Fire officials say three people are unaccounted for after an explosion and partial building collapse at a Minneapolis school.
The Minneapolis Fire Department initially tweeted that one fatality was reported in Wednesday’s collapse at Minnehaha Academy. But fire officials haven’t been able to confirm that report, and Assistant Fire Chief Bryan Tyner says they are backing off that statement.
Tyner says three people were rescued from the building’s roof. He says crews are searching for others who might be trapped in the rubble, including three people who are unaccounted for. He didn’t immediately know when the missing are adults or children.
He says it appears the explosion might have been caused by a ruptured gas line, but that the investigation is ongoing.
Minnehaha Academy is a Christian college prep school, serving students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.

Fire officials are responding to a building collapse in Minneapolis and trying to determine whether anyone is dead.
The Minneapolis Fire Department tweeted that one fatality has been reported in Wednesday’s collapse, but fire officials haven’t been able to confirm that death.
Police and firefighters are on the scene at Minnehaha Academy. Authorities say crews are extinguishing a fire and searching for possible victims.


Philippine trash trawlers earn little from virus-boosted surge in plastics

Updated 29 min 19 sec ago

Philippine trash trawlers earn little from virus-boosted surge in plastics

MANILA: Virgilio Estuesta has picked through trash in the Philippines’ biggest city for four decades, and is noticing an unusually large amount of plastics during his daily trawl of about 15 km (9.3 miles).
Tough curbs re-imposed to combat a surge in daily coronavirus infections are squeezing income for the 60-year-old, as many of the junkyards and businesses in Manila that buy his recyclables have been closed since March.
Plastic items, such as bottles and containers, dominate the contents of the rickety wooden cart Estuesta pushes through the deserted streets, far more than metals and cardboard, yet the money they bring in is not enough to get by.
“It’s been really hard for us, it’s been difficult looking for recyclables that sell high,” he said.
“Recently we’ve been seeing a lot more plastics, but the problem is they don’t really sell high.”
Environmentalists say the Philippines is battling one of the world’s biggest problems stemming from single-use plastics, and ranks among the biggest contributors to plastic pollution of the oceans. It has no reliable data for its plastics consumption.
Greenpeace campaigner Marian Ledesma said consumers and businesses are now using yet more single-use plastics, in a bid to ward off virus infections.
“The pandemic has really increased plastic pollution,” she added. “Just because there’s a lot more people using disposables now, due to misconceptions and fears around transmitting the virus.”
Since March 16, Manila has experienced lockdowns of varying levels of severity, in some of the world’s longest and tightest measures to curb the spread of the virus.
They are taking a toll on Estuesta, who hopes to start earning soon.
“When you go out, the police will reprimand you,” he said. “I was stuck at home and had to rely on government aid, which was not enough. I had to resort to borrowing money from people.”