Watch: Haifa Wehbe announced as the face of new action-packed video game

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Haifa Wehbe, who is the gaming company’s first-ever celebrity ambassador, stars in an action-packed game. (Photo courtesy: Twitter)
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Haifa Wehbe, who is the gaming company’s first-ever celebrity ambassador, stars in an action-packed game. (Photo courtesy: Twitter)
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Updated 18 October 2017

Watch: Haifa Wehbe announced as the face of new action-packed video game

DUBAI: Gaming app WIZZO announced Tuesday that their new brand ambassador is none other than Lebanese superstar Haifa Wehbe.
The MBC Group, which runs the app, unveiled the news at an event in Dubai and the gaming world reacted with excitement online.
“I downloaded the game only because of my queen hayouffaaa,” one Twitter user posted.
Wehbe, who is the app’s first-ever celebrity ambassador, is the face of an action-packed game called “Invasion.”

“Having Haifa (Wehbe) as the ambassador of the game ‘Invasion’ on WIZZO was part of culturizing and localizing the game for the region and (she) was the perfect fit to the category of the game,” Amin El-Husseini, senior mobile product manager at MBC Group, told Arab News.
“She was excited to be part of the game as well as she knows that the youth today spend most of their time on their mobiles playing games and she would be closer to them.”
The army-style game is available on Android and IOS and was released by WIZZO, an app that features games and challenges. The more a user plays, the more points he or she can rack up and top scorers can win prizes.

Both Wehbe and WIZZO have shared various images of the star on their social media pages, all complete with the singer and actress dressed up in army wear and beset with heavy weapons. Wehbe still manages to look glamorous, however, with her cascading curls of black hair.

The Lebanese star is known for her beauty and her daring outfits and in March was ranked among the most beautiful women in the world, according to Wonderlist’s annual poll.

The 41-year-old Arab pop singer ranked 10th on the “2017’s Top 10 Most Beautiful Women Over 40” list that also names many global celebrities such as, Jennifer Lopez, Aishwarya Rai, Angelina Jolie, Penelope Cruz and Monica Bellucci.


Man eats $120,000 piece of art — a banana taped to wall

Updated 08 December 2019

Man eats $120,000 piece of art — a banana taped to wall

MIAMI: The move was bananas ... or maybe the work was just too appealing.
A performance artist shook up the crowd at the Art Basel show in Miami Beach on Saturday when he grabbed a banana that had been duct-taped to a gallery wall and ate it.
The banana was, in fact, a work of art by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan titled “Comedian” and sold to a French collector for $120,000.
In a video posted on his Instagram account, David Datuna, who describes himself as a Georgian-born American artist living in New York, walks up to the banana and pulls it off the wall with the duct tape attached.
“Art performance ... hungry artist,” he said, as he peeled the fruit and took a bite. “Thank you, very good.”
A few bystanders could be heard giggling before a flustered gallery official whisked him to an adjoining space for questioning.
But the kerfuffle was resolved without a food fight.
“He did not destroy the art work. The banana is the idea,” Lucien Terras, director of museum relations for Galerie Perrotin, told the Miami Herald.
As it turns out, the value of the work is in the certificate of authenticity, the newspaper said. The banana is meant to be replaced.
A replacement banana was taped to the wall about 15 minutes after Datuna’s stunt.
“This has brought a lot of tension and attention to the booth and we’re not into spectacles,” Terras said. “But the response has been great. It brings a smile to a lot of people’s faces.”
Cattelan is perhaps best known for his 18-carat, fully functioning gold toilet called “America” that he had once offered on loan to US President Donald Trump.
The toilet, valued at around $5 to $6 million, was in the news again in September when it was stolen from Britain’s Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of wartime leader Winston Churchill, where it had been on display.