Ancient mining operations buildings found in Egypt

A handout picture provided by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities on January 11, 2018 shows the ruins of two buildings used to supervise mines in ancient Egypt more than 4,400 years ago. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AFP)
Updated 11 January 2018

Ancient mining operations buildings found in Egypt

CAIRO: The ruins of two buildings used to supervise mines in ancient Egypt more than 4,400 years ago have been discovered in the south, the antiquities ministry said on Thursday.
The find was made by a US-Egyptian mission in the Tal Edfu area north of the city of Aswan.
One building was from the era of the pharaoh Djedkare Isesi of the fifth dynasty which ruled Egypt more than 4,400 years ago, the ministry said.
The other was constructed during the sixth dynasty which ruled between 2,323 BC and 2,135 BC.
“The complex consists of two massive buildings containing many rooms and it is yet to be fully examined,” the antiquities ministry’s Ayman Ashmawy told AFP.
“These buildings were used as administrative buildings for the mining teams which would head to the eastern desert to search for gold, copper and precious stones.”
The mission found a large number of seals “used to seal everything that would enter and leave storage,” in addition to correspondence between officials and the pharaoh, he said.
According to historians, Djedkare Isesi’s era was known for its expeditions to extract raw materials, especially copper, from south Sinai.
Separately near Aswan, an Egyptian team found a limestone funerary plate 40 centimeters (nearly 16 inches) tall and 27 centimeters (10.5 inches) wide, Ashmawy said.
It was found in the temple of Kom Ombo where a 25-centimeter-tall sandstone statue of a person squatting and two statues of the deity Horus were also discovered.


US sprinter beats Usain Bolt’s 200m world record - but only runs 185m

Updated 10 July 2020

US sprinter beats Usain Bolt’s 200m world record - but only runs 185m

  • Lyles was racing alone against competitors simultaneously sprinting on tracks in Europe.

LONDON: For a few fleeting minutes, US sprinter Noah Lyles thought he had broken the long-standing 200 meter world record at the Inspiration Games on Thursday.

Lyles, 22, is the 200m world champion and his time of 18.90 seconds would have smashed the 19.19 mark set by Jamaican superstar Usain Bolt in 2009.

But the headline time will not go into the history books after it was revealed he only ran 185 meters due to a blunder by the event organizers putting the starting line in the wrong place.

Lyles was racing alone against competitors simultaneously sprinting on tracks in Europe.

His staggering time was immediately challenged by commentators watching the event.

“You can’t be playing with my emotions like this....Got me in the wrong lane smh,” he tweeted. He later tweeted again to correct himself, saying he had in fact started on the wrong line. 

The farcical ending to one of the headline races in the event will be an embarrassment for the organizers who were banking on showing the world that technology can make a major international athletics event possible despite the restrictions of the coronavirus pandemic.