Oil and gas sector is key to increasing number of women in workforce: Report

A view shows Saudi Aramco's khurais mega project in Saudi Arabia, in this February 5, 2013 file photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 19 February 2018

Oil and gas sector is key to increasing number of women in workforce: Report

RIYADH: Oil and gas is the sector that could lead the change to increasing female participation in the workforce, said the author of a new report launched on Saturday night.
The Canadian Embassy hosted the launch of the report, “Energy: Driving force behind increasing female participation in the Gulf?”
The report is the result of collaboration between the Royal Bank of Canada Capital Markets and the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. The author, Bina Hussein, was at the launch to discuss the report.
“The embassy is proud to launch the report in the Kingdom since promoting women’s economic empowerment and participation is one of Canada’s top priorities,” Aliya Mawani, head of the political and economic section, told Arab News. The report was launched earlier in Abu Dhabi.
The report also covers Qatar, the UAE, and Kuwait. Asked why Oman and Bahrain are not included, Hussein said countries were chosen on the basis of proven oil reserves, being major exporters, and stated intentions to implement reforms that could lead to major societal change.
Khlood A. Aldukheil, a well-known figure in the financial community, served as the moderator. She is the managing director of the Aldukheil Financial Group and the first Saudi woman to attain a CFA designation.
Talking about her report, Hussein said: “Energy is such an integral part of these Gulf economies that it has become part of the diversification process — and if there is one sector that could lead the change to increase female participation in the workforce, the oil and gas sector is it,” she said.
She said with reforms plans, the governments of the selected GCC countries are attempting to bring about similar changes in their economies, without necessarily decreasing the government’s influence or stake in the economies, and keeping the culture and traditions intact.
The report notes the progress in the Kingdom in expanding women’s rights in recent years and that statistically, women tend to be better educated than men.
During the question-and-answer session, everyone agreed the focus should not be just on getting more women into the energy sector, but into positions of leadership and influence in that sector.
Ata Subaity, a Shoura Council member, asked Hussein why she chose the subject when it is known that not many women, if any, are involved in the energy sector.
Hussein, also the associate director with the Global Energy Center, said it was because it is the backbone of the Saudi economy.
Princess Madawi bint Fahad Alfarhan Al-Saud, honorary president of Nafeh Charitable Society, said: “We have to bear in mind that many Saudi women have worked in the engineering sector for several years and some of them worked in jobs not available to men, such as in trams at the Princess Noura bint Abdulrahman University.”
She added the “Vision 2030 plan has made the legal systems safer for Saudi women to work in the energy sector.”
Nujood K. Almulla, a 24-year-old mechanical engineer, said: “The report on the role of women in the energy sector is both critical and timely, given the present circumstances in the Kingdom, including the projects that it has embarked upon.”
She said she feels self-fulfillment in working as energy systems analyst at the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center, “given the fact that the energy sector is the backbone of the economy.”


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 9 min 22 sec ago

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.