Saudis develop heart disease 10 years younger than global average

Saudis develop heart disease 10 years younger than global average
Handout photo released by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS in Spanish) press office showing doctor David Arellano (L) conducting a surgery at the La Raza hospital in Mexico City, on September 14, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 06 March 2018

Saudis develop heart disease 10 years younger than global average

Saudis develop heart disease 10 years younger than global average

RIYADH: The average age for developing heart disease in the Kingdom is 56, 10 years younger than the global average, the president of the Saudi Heart Association (SHA) said in an address to its 29th annual conference.
“The number of men and women suffering from heart disease is equal… though men used to have the largest share of the disease,” the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) quoted Dr. Hussam Al-Faleh as saying. He stressed the importance of exercising and healthy eating.
During the conference, a new treatment approved by the American Medical Association and the Saudi Food and Drug Authority was introduced.
“This treatment will effectively reduce cholesterol by 60 percent,” Al-Faleh said. He cited Khalaf Al-Balawi, a 79-year-old Saudi who ran a 21-km half marathon, as an example of the importance of exercise. Al-Balawi thanked the SHA for inviting him to the conference and honoring him.
Dr. Mohammed Balghith said 60 percent of patients with heart disease suffer type 2 diabetes due to lack of activity, excessive fat intake and smoking.
The chairman of the Department of Cardiology at the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Dr. William Zogby, said Saudi cardiologists are among the best because they graduate from the world’s top universities and train at leading hospitals.
“The most common challenge faced by Saudi cardiologists is that their patients are not interested in exercising,” he added, stressing the importance of keeping in check one’s blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol.
At the end of the conference, the SHA announced the winners of scientific research awards worth more than SR250,000 ($66,665).
Dr. Walid Al-Jawhar, Dr. Owaid Al-Shammari and Dr. Fatima Massoudi received the Prof. Mohammad Al-Faqih Annual Award.
Dr. Fatima Sharafuddin received the Dr. Zuhair Al-Hallis Annual Prize, and Dr. Mohammed Mahamoud Nassif received the Dr. Wael Al-Mohaimeed Prize.


Saudi Arabia ranked safest among G20 nations, according to international indicators

Updated 11 min 39 sec ago

Saudi Arabia ranked safest among G20 nations, according to international indicators

Saudi Arabia ranked safest among G20 nations, according to international indicators
  • Results ranked Kingdom ahead of five permanent UNSC members — US, Russia, China, UK and France

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s progress has led to the Kingdom ranking first among G20 nations for safety, outperforming the five permanent members of the UN Security Council (UNSC), international safety indicators showed on Wednesday.

The results were revealed through five security indicators included in the Global Competitiveness Report 2019, and the Sustainable Development Goals Index 2020 (SDG Index 2020).

The SDG index ranked the Kingdom first among G20 nations, and ahead of the five permanent UNSC members — US, Russia, China, UK and France — in the percentage of population who feel safe walking alone at night. Saudi Arabia also performed better than Canada within the G20 countries.

Saudi Arabia also ranked first in the reliability of police services index; an indicator which measures public confidence in law enforcement and its success in achieving order and safety. The Kingdom topped the G20, and surpassed the five permanent UNSC members in this index as well.

The Kingdom also outperformed the five UNSC countries in an index measuring the effectiveness of combating organized crime, as stated by the Global Competitiveness Report 2019. Saudi Arabia came in second in the same index among G20 nations.

The Global Competitiveness Report issued by the World Economic Forum also showed that the Kingdom advanced three positions, now ranking 36 globally in international competitiveness.

The report pointed out the Kingdom’s energetic steps forward to diversify its economy, with expectations of growth in the non-oil sector. The report also discussed the emergence of more investments outside the mining industry within the public and private sectors in the next few years.

The report commended the Kingdom's strong determination to undertake structural reforms, its widespread adoption of communication technology, and its high potential for innovation, especially in terms of patent registration.