Saudi Arabia's crown prince visits Lockheed Martin's Silicon Valley Site

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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson, tour Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale facility. (SPA)
Updated 07 April 2018

Saudi Arabia's crown prince visits Lockheed Martin's Silicon Valley Site

  • Saudi Crown Prince met with Lockheed Martin CEO Marillyn Hewson.
  • Mohammed bin Salman toured advanced technologies for both air and missile defense and satellite communications.

Sunnyvale, California: Lockheed Martin's top executive hosted on Friday the Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, at the company's Sunnyvale, California site.
Sunnyvale is home to many of the company's satellite programs as well as technologies for missile defense, solar array production and advanced research and development.
The Crown Prince and Marillyn Hewson, Lockheed Martin Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, toured advanced technologies for both air and missile defense and satellite communications. The visit included meeting with executives representing various programs in the company's portfolio, viewing key elements of the THAAD system and a tour of the satellite assembly and test facility where Lockheed Martin is building two communications satellites for Arabsat and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST).
"For more than 50 years, we have been proud to partner for the national security and economic growth of Saudi Arabia," Hewson said. "That's why it was a special honor to host His Royal Highness Mohammed bin Salman at our Space facility here in Silicon Valley.

 

THAAD is one of the key elements in the U.S. military's layered ballistic missile defense. It is one of most advanced missile systems on the planet and can hunt and blast incoming missiles right out of the sky from its truck-based launcher.
The interceptors fired from THAAD's launcher do not carry warheads and instead use pure kinetic energy to deliver "hit to kill" strikes to ballistic threats.
During the visit, he saw firsthand the powerful and innovative satellites being built for Arabsat, which will enhance the Kingdom's technological capabilities. He also met the Saudi engineers who have worked side-by-side with Lockheed Martin engineers to learn satellite assembly, integration, and test skills. And, together, they celebrated what these efforts will mean for building Saudi Arabia's future space industry and for increasing economic opportunity and job creation throughout the Kingdom."
In 2015 Arabsat and KACST awarded Lockheed Martin a contract for two LM 2100-based satellites: Arabsat-6A and Hellas-Sat-4/SaudiGeoSat-1. The two satellites will provide advanced telecommunications capabilities, including television, internet, telephone and secure communications, to important government users and commercial customers in the Middle East, Africa and Europe. Both satellites are slated for delivery in 2018.
Lockheed Martin has had a presence in Saudi Arabia since 1965 with the first delivery of the C-130 Hercules. Since then, the company has continued to work to expand its footprint in the Kingdom in integrated air and missile defense systems, tactical and rotary wing technologies, maritime systems and satellite communications. The company's presence is supported by training initiatives that encourage and train the next generation of Saudi talent –ensuring the sustainability of the aerospace and defense industry and to support the Kingdom's Vision 2030 objectives.
Saudi Arabia is one of the top clients of the Bethesda, Maryland-based defense contractor. Last year, Riyadh expressed intent to procure more than $28 billion worth of Lockheed Martin combat ships, aircraft and missile defense systems over the next 10 years.

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Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 100,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.


Two Holy Mosques in Saudi Arabia ready to confront health epidemics

Updated 32 min 57 sec ago

Two Holy Mosques in Saudi Arabia ready to confront health epidemics

  • The Kingdom has gained experience in dealing with millions of peoples, says crowd expert

MAKKAH: The General Presidency for the Affairs of the Two Holy Mosques has announced its readiness to deal with any epidemic cases. It said that it will provide all necessary information to pilgrims and has doubled cleaning times of the courtyards and corridors of the Grand Mosque in Makkah.

The presidency said that it is raising media awareness in all languages and through informative screens to distribute the latest medical instructions and emergency developments.

Abdulhamid Al-Maliki, assistant undersecretary for services affairs at the presidency, told Arab News that the Two Holy Mosques are collaborating with public health authorities to face all possible situations.

Al-Maliki said that he has been working hand-in-hand with governmental and private agencies to distribute masks and hand sanitizer.

He added that coordination has been made with public health-related bodies to mobilize the necessary media coverage to inform all pilgrims of different nationalities wherever they may be.

The assistant undersecretary said that responding to all instructions and advice is necessary for the best handling of health issues.

Crowd expert Akram Jan said that Saudi Arabia has gained experience in dealing with crowds and millions of people, and that it was prepared to handle several sudden scenarios as well as the most difficult situations with success.

Jan said that the difficulties that accompany the presence of viruses — such as the new coronavirus — are their ability to spread and infect through contact or sneezing. He added that the Kingdom is taking precautionary measures to prevent a disaster from happening.

 

Disinfection

The floors of Makkah’s Grand Mosque are washed and disinfected four times daily as part of measures to ensure the safety of pilgrims and visitors.

Highly qualified cadres use the best technology and cleaning and sanitizing tools, said Jaber Widaani, director of the mosque’s department of disinfection and carpets. 

There are 13,500 prayer rugs at the mosque, all of which are swept and fragranced on a daily basis, he added.

Since the new coronavirus emerged in December 2019 in central China, it has sickened 82,000 people globally, with more than 2,700 deaths. The illness it causes was named COVID-19, a reference to its origin late last year.

Middle East countries have been implementing measures to protect their citizens and residents from the rising coronavirus cases.

On Thursday, Dubai’s Emirates announced a temporary ban on carrying Umrah pilgrims and tourists from nearly two dozen countries to Saudi Arabia.

The announcement came after the Kingdom placed a temporary ban on pilgrims from entering the country to perform Umrah, in an effort to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Nearly 7 million Umrah pilgrims visit the Kingdom each year, the majority of whom arrive at airports in Jeddah and Madinah.