TheFace: Dr. Lama S. Taher, the successful fashion designer whose one dream was not enough

Dr. Lama S. Taher (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 20 April 2018

TheFace: Dr. Lama S. Taher, the successful fashion designer whose one dream was not enough

  • Lacking in financial assistance but armed with grit, perseverance and passion, a young Saudi woman fashion designer launches her own brand while pursuing further studies, and succeed in both

I was born and raised in Riyadh and moved to London in 2004 to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree, followed by a Master’s degree in Mental Health.

Eight years ago, when I started on my Ph.D. in Psychology, I felt compelled to go into fashion design. Armed with grit, perseverance and passion, I took the plunge and launched my own brand, LUM, in May 2010.

I had no financial assistance and no fancy business plans — but I believed in it. No one else did, except my older sister who stood by me.

In spite of its humble beginning, the brand was well-received in the Kingdom and the Gulf region. But my father, a physician, was not convinced. I placed a bet with him, vowing to make substantial sales and revenue within one month. On July 1, 2013, I won that bet, making him my number one supporter.  In 2016, I achieved my academic dream, obtaining a Ph.D. in psychology at City University London.  

But it was not easy. Enduring sleepless nights and homesickness, I persevered to meet high academic demands. Meanwhile, the LUM business continued to flourish.

People asked why a successful fashion designer would pursue a doctorate in psychology. I was constantly asked to pick one — but my heart was in one and my mind was in another. 

Few believed I could achieve both. At times, I too doubted myself.

Today, I am an assistant professor at Dar Al Hekma University in Jeddah, supervising award-winning researchers. I am also a Saudi designer and manager of a successful fashion brand sold in the GCC, New York and Los Angeles.  I share my story to empower women to pursue their dreams, to believe in themselves, to fight for what they want.

People still ask: “Why both?” 

I reply, smiling: “Because one dream was not enough.” 


Brazilian-Lebanese designer Nadine Ghosn’s award-winning accessories 

Nadine Ghosn is the daughter of the former Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn. (Supplied)
Updated 20 February 2020

Brazilian-Lebanese designer Nadine Ghosn’s award-winning accessories 

  • The Brazilian-Lebanese designer on her love of jewelry, taking risks, and advice from her father, Carlos

LONDON: Born in America and based in London, the award-winning Brazilian-Lebanese designer Nadine Ghosn is as quirky and jubilant as her namesake fine jewelry line that she launched in 2016. 

Elements of contemporary culture as well as her personal experiences — from her early days in Japan to a love of old-school stationery and popular food classics — inspire her bold creations. And beneath all of that pop and color, jewelry holds a sentimental value for the Stanford-educated entrepreneur. 

“I’m an extremely sensitive person and jewelry is kind of like my token of moments, memories, and people,” Ghosn tells Arab News. “When I started creating jewelry, my goal was to create something that really means something to the (buyer), but also says something about the time we’re in. Going back through time, you (can learn) a lot about civilizations’ cultures through their jewelry, transitioning from one generation to the next.” 

The ‘Hamburger Ring’ was designed around the theme of food uniting people. (Supplied)

Ghosn’s love of accessories stems from her childhood, particularly when her father — the former Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn — would return with gifts from his travels. In her teens, she recalls, “I always spent my money on jewelry. I couldn’t care less about what I was wearing but I would always accessorize it in a specific way.” 

Having majored in art and economics, Ghosn began her career in a New York consulting firm, followed by a rotational program at Hermès. Once she had gained a deeper understanding of craftsmanship, Ghosn turned down a major job offer to begin her own independent career path. “At that point, I was 24 going on 25 and I was just thinking about what my job meant to me and what I was trying to achieve. ‘Am I going to take a risk?’ Those big questions were kind of on my mind,” she says. 

A chance encounter during a timely visit to Lebanon turned into a ‘light-bulb moment’ for Ghosn; she encountered a Beirut jewelry manufacturer, who explained that his studio was struggling as demand for such spaces — and craftsmanship — had declined significantly. Ghosn struck a deal with him: he would teach her to work with gold and she, in return, would design her debut collection in his space.

An 18-karat gold design of seven stackable rings representing different layers of a burger, it was a design that she says raised the eyebrows of those closest to her. (Supplied)

One of Ghosn’s earliest pieces remains the most special to her: The ‘Hamburger Ring’ — which was designed around the theme of food uniting people. An 18-karat gold design of seven stackable rings representing different layers of a burger, it was a design that she says raised the eyebrows of those closest to her. 

“When I first showed it to my family, I remember them saying that no one was going to buy it,” she says. “I had faith in it and when it got momentum it was (proof that) when you believe in something, you should go for it.” The piece has ended up selling to a wide range of clients, from teenagers to 65-year-olds — and including the founder of Wendy’s burger chain. 

Over the years, a number of celebrities have been spotted wearing Ghosn’s pieces. Beyoncé wore the tongue-in-cheek ‘Shut Up’ earring cuff for her 35th birthday celebrations, and Karl Lagerfeld has sported the ‘Can You Hear Me?’ headphones necklace. 

“Too Cool For School” is Ghosn’s latest geek-chic collection. (Supplied)

Ghosn’s latest geek-chic collection is “Too Cool For School,” which ranges from a pencil ring to a paperclip bracelet and protractor earrings. It is, she says, somewhat inspired by her time in Japan — a place where stationery is something of an obsession for many. “The pencil is a simple but empowering tool, and everyone writes their own story,” she says.  

While we often hear the popular idiom “Like father, like son,” in Ghosn’s case, it’s more “Like father, like daughter,” for she shares her father’s entrepreneurial spirit and openness to new ideas. 

“Too Cool For School” ranges from a pencil ring to a paperclip bracelet and protractor earrings. (Supplied)

“My dad always challenged us to be extremely independent,” she says. “He was always very bold and that’s obviously within my DNA as well. Today, we’ve learned much more about each other — he finally says that I’m a jewelry designer because, for the first year or two, he had reservations. But thankfully, because people are purchasing and the fact that the business is profitable, I finally get the ‘designer’ label in my family.” 

As for the best advice she received from her father before starting her own business, she recalls him telling her: “Whatever you do, be the best at it. Make yourself indispensable.”