FaceOf: Mohammed Al-Jadaan, Saudi Finance Minister

Saudi Minister of Finance Mohammed Al-Jadaan arrives to attends the Euromoney conference in the Saudi capital Riyadh on May 2, 2018 . The two-day conference will focus on Saudi Arabia's finance and investments. (FAYEZ NURELDINE / AFP)
Updated 09 May 2018

FaceOf: Mohammed Al-Jadaan, Saudi Finance Minister

  • Al-Jadaan attained a degree in Islamic economics from Imam Muhammad bin Saud Islamic University.
  • Al-Jadaan: This year, we are seeking to distribute government spending in a balanced manner throughout the fiscal year.

The first quarter budget performance report for the fiscal year 2018 shows significant growth in non-oil revenues and anticipated expenditure increases on an annual basis, Saudi Arabia’s Finance Ministry recently announced. 

Minister of Finance Mohammed Al-Jadaan said: “This year, we are seeking to distribute government spending in a balanced manner throughout the fiscal year and reduce seasonal expenditure, in order to boost economic growth rates and maximize the benefits.”

He  has been finance minister since November 2016. Before this, Al-Jadaan served as chairman of the Capital Markets Authority, chairman of the board of directors of the Saudi Center for Commercial Arbitration and special adviser to the board of directors at Morgan Stanley Saudi Arabia. He was also a commercial lawyer and the co-founder of Al-Jadaan and Partners Law Firm in cooperation with Clifford Chance from 1995-2015.

Al-Jadaan attained a degree in Islamic economics from Imam Muhammad bin Saud Islamic University and a degree in legal studies from the Institute of Public Administration in Riyadh.

He specialized in commercial law, finance and financial market transactions, and directed a team of lawyers in the provision of legal services and contracts in transactions and joint ventures in the sectors of energy, petrochemicals, mining, water desalination, privatization and partnership between the public and private sector, project finance and initial public offers on the stock markets.

Al-Jadaan is also the chairman of the Financial Sector Development Program committee, the chairman of the Fiscal Balance Program committee, the chairman of the Financial Stability Committee, the chairman of the board of the General Authority of Customs, and the chairman of the Saudi side of the subcommittee of the high-level Saudi-Chinese Joint Committee.


Culture documentation by Saudi ministry to help dispel misconceptions

Updated 22 October 2020

Culture documentation by Saudi ministry to help dispel misconceptions

  • Dia hopes the documenting process will be done professionally and without bias

JEDDAH: Saudi artists welcomed the Ministry of Culture’s first-of-its-kind 16/13 initiative, documenting the diversity of Saudi culture and art through a visual library.
The library will display 16 aspects of culture and heritage through photography and videography that represent the 13 regions of the Kingdom.
Researchers will go around Saudi Arabia to meet creatives, and study their work, for inclusion in the initiative.
“This is an important step for the Kingdom, and it’s a global one to document visual art, whether works of art or cinema,” Dia Aziz Dia, Saudi artist and sculptor, told Arab News.
He added: “It’s important because this creates a database and can be used as a reference to study and compare paintings, photography, sculpting and various types of art, how they differ from one region to the next.”
It could also let government bodies discover art worthy of being put into museums for display, said Dia.
“It’s a good way to document history as well, and to study works of art and the standards of art here,” he said. “It’s on a global level and it’s done everywhere in the world, from England to the US.”
Dia hopes the documenting process will be done professionally and without bias.
He also said it was not easy to compile these works. “It’s an elaborate process to be able to get hold of all the works across the Kingdom. It’s an operation that requires organization, extensive studying and the cooperation of the Society of Culture and Arts and artists as well.”
Saad Tahaitah, documentary filmmaker and photographer, told Arab News that the initiative was promising. He was exposed to it through Saudi photographer Nawaf Al-Shehri, who has been traveling to help with the documentation process.
“The ministry’s been doing an incredible job; they’re (Nawaf and his team) going around the Kingdom and filming content for an actual library,” he said.
Tahaitah has worked on numerous short films on his own to depict the culture and heritage of Asir region, in the southwest of the country. He said he would not trade it for any other place and wished only to film in his hometown.
“I got into documentaries because I wanted honest storytelling. I didn’t want to write a script and hire actors, although that works for some,” he said. “The way I’ve been doing film is to let the person I’m filming go about their day and I let my camera roll.”
Tahaitah started documenting Asir because he wanted to dispel the misconceptions about it, and the stereotypes created through media like “Tash Ma Tash,” the famous Saudi comedy show.
“Asir is full of natural beauty and scenery to capture. It’s diverse in its sights and the people who live in it. Every once in a while, I realize there’s a thing I never noticed before and I film it, and I’ve lived here all my life. The way of life here, simply, can inspire you,” he said.
He added: “We don’t have one particular dance or only sit and dine in a huddle. In a way, I just wanted to showcase the reality of Asir because I love it.”
He said that this initiative could correct inaccuracies shared about certain areas in the Kingdom.