Jeddah hotel occupancy falls amid rising supply

Rising capacity and dwindling demand saw Jeddah's hotel occupancy rate plunge in April. (Shutterstock)
Updated 11 May 2018

Jeddah hotel occupancy falls amid rising supply

  • Occupancy rate slumps 13.5% year on year in April
  • Abu Dhabi occupancy rises 2.7% despite lack of significant events

LONDON: Hotel occupancy in Jeddah fell to its lowest level in 14 years in April, with weakening demand combining with a surge in new supply.

Occupancy slumped 13.5 percent year on year to 53.5 percent last month, according to hospitality research firm STR. Demand fell 4.8 percent year on year, while the supply of hotel rooms was up 10.1 percent.

The fall in demand had a knock-on effect on revenue per available room (RevPAR) for the city’s hotels, which fell 9.4% to SR439.90 for the month, its lowest reading since 2008. The fall came despite a 4.7 percent year-on-year increase in average daily rates to SR822.06.

“Heavy investments in the region, which led to a 15.8% increase in supply for 2017, are making it difficult for hoteliers to stabilize RevPAR,” STR said in a statement yesterday.

Fellow market research firm TOPHOTELPROJECTS predicts a total of 84 hotels — comprising 27,281 rooms — will open in Saudi Arabia in 2018, with the majority opening in Riyadh, Jeddah, Makkah and Al-Khobar.

Hotels in Abu Dhabi meanwhile enjoyed higher occupancy levels last month, according to STR, despite a lack of major events in the emirate during the month to drive bookings.

Occupancy rose 2.7 percent to 80 percent in April, as demand rose 6.9 percent and supply increased 4.1 percent.

“The absolute occupancy level would be the highest for an April in the market since 2008,” the firm said.

But the ADR slipped 3.3% to 432.12 dirhams (SR,440.93), resulting in a 0.7 percent decline in revenue per RevPAR to 345.88 dirhams.

“ADR decreases have been common in the market with supply growth a factor in that trend,” STR said.

Abu Dhabi is targeting to attract 8.5 million tourists a year by 2021 and has been ramping up efforts to promote the emirate as a culture and heritage destination, especially with the opening of Louvre Abu Dhabi, the only regional presence of the famous French museum, in late 2016.

The emirate expects to welcome 5.5 million hotel guests this year, up from about 5 million in 2017.


UBS fined $51 million by Hong Kong regulator for overcharging clients

Updated 11 November 2019

UBS fined $51 million by Hong Kong regulator for overcharging clients

  • Hong Kong regulator’s investigation exposed ‘serious systemic internal control failures’ at the bank
  • In March, the Securities and Futures Commission banned UBS from leading initial public offerings in Hong Kong for a year

HONG KONG: Swiss bank UBS was fined HK$400 million ($51.09 million) by Hong Kong’s securities regulator for overcharging up to 5,000 clients for nearly a decade, the watchdog said on Monday.
The Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission (SFC) said in a statement that an investigation found UBS had overcharged clients on ‘post-trade spread increases’ and charges in excess of standard disclosures and rates between 2008 and 2017.
THE SFC said the investigation exposed ‘serious systemic internal control failures’ at the bank. UBS had failed to disclose conflicts of interests and had overcharged some clients in ‘opaque’ trades, it said.
The overcharging affected 5000 Hong Kong managed client accounts in about 28,700 transactions, it said.
UBS has also agreed to repay the clients HK$200 million, the SFC said.
The regulator said the over-charging occurred in the bank’s wealth management division on bond and structured notes transactions.
UBS was found to have increased the spread charged after the execution of a trade without the clients’ knowledge, it said.
In the statement, the SFC said UBS was also found to have falsified some account statements which were issued to financial intermediaries who were authorized to trade for the clients to “conceal the overcharges.”
UBS said the issues were ‘self-reported’ to the SFC and the results found were against the bank’s standard practice.
“The relevant conduct predominantly relates to limit orders of certain debt securities and structured note transactions, which account for a very small percentage of the bank’s order processing system,” the bank said in a statement.
SFC chief executive Ashley Alder said while each “overcharge represented a fraction of each trade” the bank’s “misconduct involved decisions and a pervasive abuse of trust resulting in significant additional revenue for UBS to which it was not entitled.”
In March, the SFC banned UBS from leading initial public offerings in Hong Kong for a year after it found the bank, and some of its rivals, had failed to carry out sufficient due diligence on a number of deals.
UBS was fined HK$375 million while Morgan Stanley was fined HK$224 million, Merrill Lynch HK$128 million and Standard Chartered (StanChart) HK$59.7 million, all for failures when sponsoring, or leading, public market floats.