FaceOf: Prince Abdullah bin Bandar, deputy governor of Makkah region

Prince Abdullah bin Bandar speaks at a workshop for development of Historic Jeddah launched in Makkah (SPA)
Updated 23 May 2018

FaceOf: Prince Abdullah bin Bandar, deputy governor of Makkah region

  • Prince Abdullah was previously a deputy head of department of the King Salman Youth Center

Prince Abdullah bin Bandar bin Abdul Aziz has been deputy governor of Makkah region since April 2017. He was previously a deputy head of department of the King Salman Youth Center.

King Salman Youth Center is a non-profit organization established to build youths into professional leaders and successful entrepreneurs.

Prince Abdullah obtained his degree from King Saud University in Riyadh. 

On Monday, Prince Abdullah sponsored the 15th graduation ceremony of the King Abdullah Air Defense College on behalf of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

It was attended by Air Defense Forces Commander Lt. Gen. Mazyad bin Sulaiman Al-Amro. Maj. Gen. Abdullah bin Mohammed Mishary, commander of the college, welcomed Prince Abdullah and the other attendees.

In February, he launched a workshop for the development of the historic area of Jeddah. It took place in cooperation with 21 bodies, including the province’s development agency; Jeddah Municipality and the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage.

During the first Makkah Region Economic Forum, the largest economic forum in the Middle East, last month at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Jeddah, Prince Abdullah held a series of meetings, directed the formation of subcommittees, and stressed the importance of highlighting the lucrative and unique investment opportunities in the region’s governorates. 

On Monday, Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal and Prince Abdullah patronized the signing of agreements between the Education Ministry and the Ministry of Labor and Social Development within an initiative led by the Integration Development Center which helps enable productive Saudi families to benefit from school canteens.


Culture documentation by Saudi ministry to help dispel misconceptions

Updated 22 October 2020

Culture documentation by Saudi ministry to help dispel misconceptions

  • Dia hopes the documenting process will be done professionally and without bias

JEDDAH: Saudi artists welcomed the Ministry of Culture’s first-of-its-kind 16/13 initiative, documenting the diversity of Saudi culture and art through a visual library.
The library will display 16 aspects of culture and heritage through photography and videography that represent the 13 regions of the Kingdom.
Researchers will go around Saudi Arabia to meet creatives, and study their work, for inclusion in the initiative.
“This is an important step for the Kingdom, and it’s a global one to document visual art, whether works of art or cinema,” Dia Aziz Dia, Saudi artist and sculptor, told Arab News.
He added: “It’s important because this creates a database and can be used as a reference to study and compare paintings, photography, sculpting and various types of art, how they differ from one region to the next.”
It could also let government bodies discover art worthy of being put into museums for display, said Dia.
“It’s a good way to document history as well, and to study works of art and the standards of art here,” he said. “It’s on a global level and it’s done everywhere in the world, from England to the US.”
Dia hopes the documenting process will be done professionally and without bias.
He also said it was not easy to compile these works. “It’s an elaborate process to be able to get hold of all the works across the Kingdom. It’s an operation that requires organization, extensive studying and the cooperation of the Society of Culture and Arts and artists as well.”
Saad Tahaitah, documentary filmmaker and photographer, told Arab News that the initiative was promising. He was exposed to it through Saudi photographer Nawaf Al-Shehri, who has been traveling to help with the documentation process.
“The ministry’s been doing an incredible job; they’re (Nawaf and his team) going around the Kingdom and filming content for an actual library,” he said.
Tahaitah has worked on numerous short films on his own to depict the culture and heritage of Asir region, in the southwest of the country. He said he would not trade it for any other place and wished only to film in his hometown.
“I got into documentaries because I wanted honest storytelling. I didn’t want to write a script and hire actors, although that works for some,” he said. “The way I’ve been doing film is to let the person I’m filming go about their day and I let my camera roll.”
Tahaitah started documenting Asir because he wanted to dispel the misconceptions about it, and the stereotypes created through media like “Tash Ma Tash,” the famous Saudi comedy show.
“Asir is full of natural beauty and scenery to capture. It’s diverse in its sights and the people who live in it. Every once in a while, I realize there’s a thing I never noticed before and I film it, and I’ve lived here all my life. The way of life here, simply, can inspire you,” he said.
He added: “We don’t have one particular dance or only sit and dine in a huddle. In a way, I just wanted to showcase the reality of Asir because I love it.”
He said that this initiative could correct inaccuracies shared about certain areas in the Kingdom.