FaceOf: Prince Mansour bin Miteb bin Abdul Aziz, Saudi Cabinet member

Prince Mansour bin Miteb bin Abdul Aziz
Updated 10 July 2018

FaceOf: Prince Mansour bin Miteb bin Abdul Aziz, Saudi Cabinet member

Prince Mansour bin Miteb bin Abdul Aziz is a minister of state, member of the Council of Ministers, and adviser to King Salman. He was formerly the minister of municipal and rural affairs of Saudi Arabia from 2009 to 2014.

On behalf of King Salman, Prince Mansour was in Ankara on Monday, attending the inauguration ceremony of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he embarked on a new term as president of Turkey. During his meeting with Erdogan, he conveyed King Salman’s congratulations and best wishes on this celebratory electoral occasion.

Prince Mansour was born in 1952. His father is one of King Abdul Aziz’s sons, Prince Miteb bin Abdul Aziz. 

Prince Mansour received all of his higher education degrees abroad in the US at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. 

He first attained his bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1976, after which he earned his master’s degree in 1979, as well as his Ph.D. in public administration in 1986. 

In 1987, upon returning to Saudi Arabia, Prince Mansour was appointed as an assistant professor at King Saud University. The following year, in 1988, he served as the director of the research center in the College of Administrative Sciences. 

Later in 1995, he became an associate professor in the Department of Public Administration. 

Prince Mansour was appointed chairman of the General Commission for Municipal Elections in late 2004. After that, he served as the deputy minister of municipal and rural affairs from 2006 to 2009. 

His term ended on Jan. 29, 2015, and he was subsequently appointed minister of state. Along with his responsibilities as a minister, he is an adviser to King Salman.


Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo/Shutterstock
Updated 19 October 2020

Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage

JEDDAH: Splashes of pink are appearing in Saudi Arabia’s public spaces to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screening.
A number of campaigns are underway this month to support this outreach — in malls, on the street and on billboards.
Pamphlets are being handed out, videos and interactive pictures are on display, there are fundraising activities such as hiking and biking, and medical students have been talking to shoppers and passers-by as part of efforts to increase people’s knowledge.
In Jeddah there was a Tai Chi class on the city’s waterfront, headed by Amatallah Bahaziq, that was attended by female members of Bliss Runners and Bolts. Another event was a bike ride organized by Jeddah Cyclists that included men and women.
A number of major cities across the Kingdom have also seen pop-up campaigns, with specialists ready to answer questions and play a proactive role in spreading proper knowledge and information about the disease, its detection and the chances of survival when detected early.

HIGHLIGHT

According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.

The Zahra Breast Cancer Association is one of Saudi Arabia’s leading organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the disease. It has been supporting cancer patients and survivors and normalizing conversations about breast cancer among the community, with a renewed emphasis during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
“Given the circumstances (due to the pandemic) we focused our efforts to raise awareness to the importance of early detection virtually,” a representative from the association told Arab News. “With billboards and visuals spread across Saudi cities, we’re still following through with our campaign promise to raise awareness each year and send the message across: Early detection will save your life.”
According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.