Saudi health ministry launches electronic program to monitor infectious diseases in blood banks

A nurse carries bags of blood donated by Saudi residents at the King Faisal Hospital in Riyadh. (File photo / Reuters)
Updated 29 July 2018

Saudi health ministry launches electronic program to monitor infectious diseases in blood banks

RIYADH: The Ministry of Health has launched a newly developed email module to monitor cases of infectious diseases detected in blood banks.
The move is part of an initiative to report infectious diseases following the successful pilot phase that was adopted by four central blood banks in Riyadh, Sharqia, Makkah and Taif.
The aim of the initiative is to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases among different blood banks in all sectors and accelerate the process of taking appropriate preventive measures.
The ‘Fortress Program’ is an integrated electronic system to control diseases and epidemics, and it is intended to monitor infectious and epidemiological diseases electronically through the Internet and to develop control mechanisms.
It also aims to electronically follow-up on basic vaccinations, standardize processes, models and health reports throughout the Kingdom, as well as reducing discrepancies in monitoring diseases between various areas and health facilities.
The program will provide health workers and decision-makers with timely and accurate information that enables them to offer the best health services.


All-female Saudi tourist group explores wonders of Tabuk

Updated 21 October 2019

All-female Saudi tourist group explores wonders of Tabuk

  • About 20 women from different parts of the Kingdom took part in the sightseeing trip to the province bordering the Red Sea

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s first all-female tourist group has explored the environmental and archaeological wonders of Tabuk in the northwest of the Kingdom.

About 20 women from different parts of the Kingdom took part in the sightseeing trip to the province bordering the Red Sea.

“They were astonished to see such sights in their country, especially the area of Ras Al-Sheikh Humaid,” said Heba Al-Aidai, a tour guide in Tabuk who organized the trip.

“They did not expect to see such a place in Saudi Arabia. They looked speechless while standing close to the turquoise water of the sea. It is a truly breathtaking view.”

Al-Aidai and her colleague Nafla Al-Anazi promoted the trip on social media and attracted a group of homemakers, teachers and staff workers from all over the Kingdom, aged from 22 to over 50.

The tour was educational, too, and the women were told about the history of the places they visited. “They were taken to the Caves of Shuaib (Magha’er Shuaib), the place where Prophet Moses fled after leaving Egypt, and where he got married to one of the daughters of Prophet Shuaib, according to some historians. It was really a positive experience,” Al-Aidai said.

The visitors also explored Tayeb Ism, a small town in northwestern Tabuk, where there is a well-known gap in the towering mountains through which water runs throughout the year.

Al-Aidai said such trips aim to encourage tourism in Tabuk, and introduce Saudi tourists and other visitors to the landmarks of the region.