British Muslims ‘genuinely fear’ persecution under UK government’s Prevent policy: Report

British Muslims are living in “genuine fear” of persecution under the UK government’s controversial counter-extremism policy Prevent, a recent report has revealed. (AFP)
Updated 30 July 2018

British Muslims ‘genuinely fear’ persecution under UK government’s Prevent policy: Report

  • Research carried out in the northern city of Manchester, after last year’s bombing at an Ariana Grande concert discovered a 'lack of communication' with Muslim communities
  • The commission also called for the Home Office to make detailed statistics on Prevent’s work available to authorities

LONDON: British Muslims are living in “genuine fear” of persecution under the UK government’s controversial counter-extremism policy Prevent, a recent report has revealed.
Research carried out in the northern city of Manchester, after last year’s bombing at an Ariana Grande concert, found that while the policy is successful in tackling many forms of radicalization, a lack of communication with Muslim communities had caused a “dangerous, perpeutuating cycle of fear” and made British Muslims unwilling to come forward to cooperate.
An eight person committee headed by Labour councillor for Bury Rishi Shori compiled the report, which went on to say: “The lack of information is exploited by those with an anti-Prevent or anti-Islam agenda who maliciously miscommunicate the aims of Prevent or true nature of the issue.
“This has perpetuated the problem, leading to the creation of suspect communities and fear of persecution among Muslim communities.”
The commission went on to warn that while the threat of further Daesh-inspired attacks and growing Islamophobia existed, the risk of terrorists and the far-right extremist groups feeding off each would only grow in the current climate.
The commission also called for the Home Office to make detailed statistics on Prevent’s work available to Manchester authoirities, as well as those in other cities, to help dispel "myths and challenge scaremongering."
Furthermore, the report said the recent drive by the UK government to instil “British values” and a “common identity” was not working, and that there was no single issue that led to radicalization.
It added that poverty, unemployment, racial inequality and a lack of social cohesion significantly raised the potential for young, vulnerable members of society to be drawn toward groups where terrorist activity was actively discussed.
The Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, who ordered the report, said in response to the report: “If the perception of the Prevent strategy is different from the reality, then that can be exploited by those seeking to undermine any form of counter-terrorism strategy.
“Therefore we accept the need, as identified in the report, to provide more information about Prevent. Any counter-terrorism strategy needs to be localized, have community buy-in and be seen to be fair to all communities rather than appearing to target one.”
In 2016, the UK’s terror law watchdog said Muslim communities saw Prevent as a “spying program” and made recommendations for it to be changed.
The report came as a result of continued warnings by watchdogs about negative public perceptions of Prevent.


Scientists discover big storms can create ‘stormquakes’

Updated 2 min 10 sec ago

Scientists discover big storms can create ‘stormquakes’

  • Shaking of sea floor during hurricanes and nor’easters can rumble like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake and can last for days
  • But a stormquake is more an oddity than something that can hurt you, says seismologist
WASHINGTON: Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters — hurricanes and earthquakes — and they’re calling them “stormquakes.”
The shaking of the sea floor during hurricanes and nor’easters can rumble like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake and can last for days, according to a study in this week’s journal Geophysical Research Letters. The quakes are fairly common, but they weren’t noticed before because they were considered seismic background noise.
A stormquake is more an oddity than something that can hurt you, because no one is standing on the sea floor during a hurricane, said Wenyuan Fan, a Florida State University seismologist who was the study’s lead author.
The combination of two frightening natural phenomena might bring to mind “Sharknado ,” but stormquakes are real and not dangerous.
“This is the last thing you need to worry about,” Fan told The Associated Press.
Storms trigger giant waves in the sea, which cause another type of wave. These secondary waves then interact with the seafloor — but only in certain places — and that causes the shaking, Fan said. It only happens in places where there’s a large continental shelf and shallow flat land.
Fan’s team found 14,077 stormquakes between September 2006 and February 2015 in the Gulf of Mexico and off Florida, New England, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Labrador and British Columbia. A special type of military sensor is needed to spot them, Fan said.
Hurricane Ike in 2008 and Hurricane Irene in 2011 set off lots of stormquakes, the study said.
The shaking is a type that creates a wave that seismologists don’t normally look for when monitoring earthquakes, so that’s why these have gone unnoticed until now, Fan said.
Ocean-generated seismic waves show up on US Geological Survey instruments, “but in our mission of looking for earthquakes these waves are considered background noise,” USGS seismologist Paul Earle said.pport from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.