Saudi cabinet approves higher committee for hydrocarbons

The decision was approved in a cabinet meeting chaired by King Salman. (SPA)
Updated 31 July 2018

Saudi cabinet approves higher committee for hydrocarbons

  • The Higher Committee for Hydrocarbon Affairs will include as members the energy minister as well as the ministers of trade, finance and economy
  • The higher committee for hydrocarbons will be headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia said on Tuesday it would form a higher committee for hydrocarbons to be headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the state news agency SPA said.
The decision was approved in a cabinet meeting chaired by King Salman. The Higher Committee for Hydrocarbon Affairs will include as members the energy minister as well as the ministers of trade, finance and economy, the statement said.
“The committee will be a reference for all hydrocarbon issues and everything relating to them and a representative of the state’s rights linked to them,” the statement on SPA said.


Lufthansa cabin crew union calls for Sunday strike in Frankfurt, Munich

Updated 14 October 2019

Lufthansa cabin crew union calls for Sunday strike in Frankfurt, Munich

  • Additional calls for strikes at the group’s five airlines are possible at any time

BERLIN: German flight attendants’ union UFO is calling for a five-hour strike on Sunday at German flag carrier Lufthansa, UFO said on Monday, in an escalating row over workers’ pay.
Flight attendants and pursers at Lufthansa’s largest hubs, Frankfurt and Munich, have been called upon to take part in the walkout, which is scheduled from 0400-0900 GMT, UFO deputy chief Daniel Flohr said in a video message released on YouTube.
Additional calls for strikes at the group’s five airlines are possible at any time and the union will discuss unlimited walkouts next week, Flohr added.
He said UFO was demanding from Lufthansa’s namesake airline a 1.8 percent pay increase over a half-year period.
At other airlines of the German group, the union is in conflict over issues including pay as well as part-time work and pension plans, Flohr said.