What We Are Reading Today: Canids of the World

Updated 26 August 2018

What We Are Reading Today: Canids of the World

This stunningly illustrated and easy-to-use field guide covers every species of the world’s carnivorous animals, from the gray wolf of North America to the dholes of Asia, from African jackals to the South American bush dog.
It features more than 150 superb color plates, depicting every kind of carnivorous animals and detailed facing-page species accounts which describe key identification features, morphology, distribution, sub-speciation, habitat, and conservation status in the wild, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.
The book also includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species, making Canids of the World the most comprehensive and user-friendly guide to these intriguing and spectacular mammals.
The book covers every species and subspecies of carnivorous animals by featuring more than 150 color plates with over 600 photos from around the globe.
It depicts species in similar poses for quick and easy comparisons, describing key identification features, habitat, behavior, reproduction, and much more.
The guide draws on the latest taxonomic research on the subject and includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species.


What We Are Reading Today: Not Born Yesterday by Hugo Mercier

Updated 26 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Not Born Yesterday by Hugo Mercier

Not Born Yesterday explains how we decide who we can trust and what we should believe — and argues that we’re pretty good at making these decisions. 

In this lively and provocative book, Hugo Mercier demonstrates how virtually all attempts at mass persuasion — whether by religious leaders, politicians, or advertisers — fail miserably, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. 

Drawing on recent findings from political science and other fields ranging from history to anthropology, Mercier shows that the narrative of widespread gullibility, in which a credulous public is easily misled by demagogues and charlatans, is simply wrong.

Why is mass persuasion so difficult? Mercier uses the latest findings from experimental psychology to show how each of us is endowed with sophisticated cognitive mechanisms of open vigilance. 

Computing a variety of cues, these mechanisms enable us to be on guard against harmful beliefs, while being open enough to change our minds when presented with the right evidence.