US Secretary of State: Iran does not control Strait of Hormuz

Pompeo’s statement came after the head of the navy of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, Gen. Alireza Tangsiri, said that Iran had full control of the Strait. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 28 August 2018

US Secretary of State: Iran does not control Strait of Hormuz

  • Pompeo’s statement came after the head of the navy of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards said that Iran had full control of the Strait
  • The Strait is a major shipping route between Oman and Iran where nearly one-third of the world’s sea-traded oil passes through daily.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Tuesday that Iran does not control the Strait of Hormuz, which he said is an international waterway.

Pompeo’s statement came after the head of the navy of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, Gen. Alireza Tangsiri, said that Iran had full control of the Strait, Reuters reported.

The Strait is a major shipping route between Oman and Iran where nearly one-third of the world’s sea-traded oil passes through daily.

However, the secretary of state said that “the United States will continue to work with our partners to ensure freedom of navigation and free flow of commerce in international waterways.”

 


Australia plans to censor extremist online content

Updated 26 August 2019

Australia plans to censor extremist online content

  • The country will create a 24/7 Crisis Coordination Center for monitoring and censorship
  • Australia earlier set up a task force with tech giants to address spread of extremist material online

SYDNEY: Australia plans to block websites to stop the spread of extreme content during “crisis events,” the country’s prime minister has said.
Speaking from the G7 in Biarritz Sunday, Scott Morrison said the measures were needed in response to the deadly attack on two New Zealand mosques in March.
The live-streamed murder of 51 worshippers “demonstrated how digital platforms and websites can be exploited to host extreme violent and terrorist content,” he said in a statement.
“That type of abhorrent material has no place in Australia, and we are doing everything we can to deny terrorists the opportunity to glorify their crimes, including taking action locally and globally.”
Under the measures, Australia’s eSafety Commissioner would work with companies to restrict access to domains propagating terrorist material.
A new 24/7 Crisis Coordination Center will be tasked with monitoring terror-related incidents and extremely violent events for censorship.
In the wake of the Christchurch attack, Australia set up a task force with global tech giants like Facebook, YouTube, Amazon, Microsoft and Twitter to address the spread of extremist material online.
It is not yet clear how the measures will be enforced. Morrison has previously suggested that legislation may come if technology companies do not cooperate.