Lebanon’s parliament approves Arms Trade Treaty

In this photo released by the Lebanese Parliament Media Office, Lebanese lawmakers attend a legislative session, at the Lebanese parliament building, in Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (AP)
Updated 25 September 2018

Lebanon’s parliament approves Arms Trade Treaty

  • Hezbollah legislator Ali Ammar walked out of the parliament Tuesday, saying it “infringes on the weapons of the resistance”
  • The 2014 treaty seeks to regulate international trade in conventional arms and prevent illicit trade

BEIRUT: Lebanon’s parliament has ratified the international Arms Trade Treaty, angering Hezbollah legislators, some of whom walked out in protest.
The 2014 treaty seeks to regulate international trade in conventional arms and prevent illicit trade. Hezbollah legislator Ali Ammar walked out of the parliament Tuesday, saying it “infringes on the weapons of the resistance.”
After Lebanon’s 15-year civil war ended in 1990, Hezbollah was allowed to keep its weapons since it was fighting Israeli forces occupying parts of southern Lebanon.
Hezbollah today has a massive arsenal including tens of thousands of rockets and missiles. The group sent thousands of its fighters to Syria to fight along President Bashar Assad’s forces.
Prime Minister designate Saad Hariri said after the treaty was approved that it has nothing to do with Hezbollah’s weapons.


Iraq PM in talks with UK's Boris Johnson on security, political reforms

Updated 22 October 2020

Iraq PM in talks with UK's Boris Johnson on security, political reforms

  • Johnson expressed his strong support for the Iraq government
  • Both leaders discussed issues of bilateral interest, and discussed recent political and security issues

LONDON: Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi and his British counterpart Boris Johnson discussed security challenges in the Middle East on Thursday.
A-Khadimi met the UK leader at Downing Street as part of an a European tour. 
Johnson expressed his strong support for the Iraq government as they discussed economic reforms, the coronavirus pandemic and the continued effort to defeat Daesh.
The Twitter account of Al-Kadhimi's office said both leaders discussed issues of bilateral interest, and discussed recent political and security issues in Iraq and the region. 
They also agreed on more cooperation in the fight against terrorism.
“It was agreed to increase more cooperation in the field of combating terrorism, as well as in the political and economic sectors, in light of the economic challenges that Iraq faces,” his office said.
Prior to his UK trip, Al-Kadhimi met with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris and German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin.
During these visits, Al-Kadhimi discussed Iraq’s main challenges such as the fight against terrorism and foreign interference in its affairs.
The Iraqi leader, who became prime minister in May, has a particularly affinity with the UK, having lived there for many years after fleeing Iraq in the 1980s.