TheFace: Ruthana Hadhrawi, Saudi entrepreneur

Ruthana Hadhrawi. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 12 October 2018

TheFace: Ruthana Hadhrawi, Saudi entrepreneur

  • Hadhrawi is a founder and director of Tana’s Touch Tablescapes and Design
  • I’ve always believed that some of the great businesses are born from genuine passions: Hadhrawi

Ruthana Hadhrawi is a founder and director of Tana’s Touch Tablescapes and Design. It is a luxurious tabletop rentals and design company. The company offers all that is needed to equip a table for intimate dinner events, formal dinners, business meetings or even casual gatherings.

Hadhrawi holds a master’s degree in business administration from Alfaisal University, where she was honored with the title of “Top Team Leader in the Class of 2015” by the College of Business.

“I’ve always believed that some of the great businesses are born from genuine passions,” said Hadhrawi. “I have an inherent passion for warm, hospitable and welcoming table styling.

“It is known that the most outstanding feature of Arab society is the generosity and hospitality. We take hospitality very seriously, using every opportunity to honor our guests to the best of our abilities.”

As time passes in the fast-paced modern world, she said it was time to come up with a new way of practicing hospitality, one that honors and accommodates guests’ preferences while controlling portion sizes, hence reducing food waste.

“Therefore, to combine modernity and tradition, Tana’s Touch was created, where quality comes before quantity,” she said. “Creating memories rather than settings. Making the dining experience exceptional and extraordinary each time.

“This October, our message is ‘hope.’ We are lighting candles for hope and with a strong determination to raise the awareness and support for those currently fighting breast cancer.” 


Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

Updated 20 October 2019

Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

  • Development will protect endangered hawksbill turtle, while coral research could help save the Great Barrier Reef

RIYADH: Key ecological targets are driving Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea tourism megaproject, its leader has told Arab News.

The development will not only protect the habitat of the endangered hawksbill turtle, but could also save coral reefs that are dying elsewhere in the world, said Red Sea Development Company Chief Executive John Pagano.

The project is taking shape in a 28,000 square kilometer region of lagoons, archipelagos, canyons and volcanic geology between the small towns of Al-Wajh and Umluj on the Kingdom’s west coast.

One island, Al-Waqqadi, looked like the perfect tourism destination, but was discovered to be a breeding ground for the hawksbill. “In the end, we said we’re not going to develop it. It shows you can balance development and conservation,” Pagano said.

Scientists are also working to explain why the area’s coral reef system — fourth-largest in the world —  is thriving when others around the world are endangered.

“To the extent we solve that mystery, the ambition would be to export that to the rest of the world,” Pagano said. “Can we help save the Great Barrier Reef or the Caribbean coral that has been severely damaged?”

 

ALSO READ: INTERVIEW: Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea project to set ‘new global standards in sustainability’, says CEO