Spotify launches in the Middle East and North Africa

Spotify has been unofficially available in the Middle East for several years via accounts usually registered in other markets such as Europe. (Reuters)
Updated 14 November 2018

Spotify launches in the Middle East and North Africa

  • Services would now be available in 13 Arab markets including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt
  • Spotify also launched its ‘Arab hub’ collection of playlists of Arab music on Wednesday

DUBAI: Spotify, the world’s most popular paid music streaming service, officially launched in the Middle East and North Africa on Tuesday.
The company said services would now be available in 13 Arab markets, including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Morocco but not Libya, Iraq, Syria, or Yemen.
Spotify has been unofficially available in the Middle East for several years via accounts usually registered in other markets such as Europe.
Claudius Boller, who previously worked in the region with Universal Music Group, is Spotify’s managing director for the Middle East and Africa.
Boller told Reuters Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, and Morocco were expected to drive regional growth, pointing to the Middle East’s youthful population and high smartphone penetration.
Spotify will charge per month for its premium service 19.99 riyals ($5.33) in Saudi Arabia, 19.99 dirhams ($5.44) in the UAE, 49.99 Egyptian pounds ($2.8) in Egypt, and $4.99 elsewhere in the Middle East and North Africa. Its free service is also now available in the region.
Spotify also added the Palestinian territories on Tuesday. Its services have been available in Israel since March.
Spotify also launched its ‘Arab hub’ collection of playlists of Arab music on Wednesday.
The Swedish company, founded in 2008, listed on the New York Stock Exchange in April. Before the launch in the Middle East and North Africa, Spotify’s music streaming services were available in 65 markets, according to its website.


News Corp. Australia’s push for digitization to lead to job losses

Updated 28 May 2020

News Corp. Australia’s push for digitization to lead to job losses

News Corp. Australia said it would restructure its organization to focus on digital publishing, a move that will also lead to job losses.
Scores of regional and community titles will be published only digitally from June 29 under the reorganization, the Australian arm of the mass media and publishing firm News Corp. said in a statement on Wednesday.
The company did not specify how many jobs could be lost, but Australian media reported up to 1,000 staff could be axed as a result of the restructuring.
It said its print publications had become unsustainable amid the coronavirus pandemic and the loss of revenue to digital platforms that use its content without payment.
“To meet these changing trends, we are reshaping News Corp. Australia to focus on where consumers and businesses are moving and to strengthen our position as Australia’s leading digital news media company,” News Corp. Australasia Executive Chairman Michael Miller said.
News Corp. incurred an impairment charge of $1.1 billion in the third quarter ended March 31, primarily related to a write-down at its struggling Australian pay television unit, Foxtel.