Saudi soldier held prisoner by Houthi militia returns home

Prisoner freed Saudi prisoner Moussa Awaji at Sanaa airport on Tuesday after he was released by Iran-backed Houthi militias. In Mokha, a UAE TV cameraman and five civilians were killed in a bomb blast. (REUTERS)
Updated 30 January 2019

Saudi soldier held prisoner by Houthi militia returns home

  • Musa Awaji landed in the Kingdom on Tuesday

JEDDAH: Saudi soldier Musa Awaji has arrived back in the Kingdom after he was released by his Houthi captors in Yemen. Col. Turki Al-Maliki, spokesman for the Coalition to Support legitimacy in Yemen, said Awaji flew in to King Salman Air Base in Riyadh at 9:45 p.m. on January 29.
The Houthis agreed to release him because of the poor state of his health and their inability to provide suitable care for him. It followed a joint negotiation effort by the leadership of the coalition forces and Martin Griffith, the special envoy of the secretary-general of the United Nations to Yemen. In return, the coalition has agreed to release seven Houthi detainees.
Al-Maliki praised Griffith and the International Committee of the Red Cross for their efforts in responding to the calls of the coalition leadership for Awaji to be released due to the concerns about his health.
Negotiations about prisoners have previously been ignored the Houthis without regard to humanitarian issues, Al-Maliki said. The militias continue to hold thousands of Yemeni people captive, including political, social and military leaders. Among them is former Yemeni Defense Minister Maj. Gen. Mahmoud Al-Subaihi, whose immediate and unconditional release has been called for by a UN Security Council resolution.


Plan approved to establish Institute of Traditional Arts in Saudi Arabia

The minister of culture announced last August that academies will be evaluated according to the market’s needs. (SPA)
Updated 23 October 2019

Plan approved to establish Institute of Traditional Arts in Saudi Arabia

  • The Institute of Traditional Arts aims to preserve the local identity through teaching arts, contributing to the preservation and development of the Saudi heritage, graduating qualified practitioners, and using arts to raise awareness

RIYADH: The minister of culture, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan, on Tuesday, adopted a plan to establish the Institute of Traditional Arts at the Royal Academy of Arts.
The institute will begin receiving applications for the fall of 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs.
The Institute of Traditional Arts aims to preserve the local identity through teaching arts, contributing to the preservation and development of the Saudi heritage, graduating qualified practitioners, and using arts to raise awareness.
The institute also aims to encourage artists through programs or partnership with relevant sectors.
The institute is part of the Academies of Arts’ initiative, which was announced in the Ministry of Culture’s first package last March, and the among the quality of life program’s initiatives. The minister of culture announced last August that academies will be evaluated according to the market’s needs, with the first being specialized in heritage and traditional arts and crafts.