US president invites bullied boy named Trump to annual speech

US president invites bullied boy named Trump to annual speech
Trump delivers his second State of the Union speech to Congress on Tuesday, his guests will include Joshua Trump, a sixth grader passionate about science and animals. (File/AFP)
Updated 05 February 2019

US president invites bullied boy named Trump to annual speech

US president invites bullied boy named Trump to annual speech
  • Trump delivers his second State of the Union speech to Congress on Tuesday, his guests will include Joshua Trump, a sixth grader passionate about science and animals
  • The president, first lady, and the 535 members of Congress are permitted to invite guests to the annual speech, a key fixture in the American political calendar

WASHINGTON: When US President Donald Trump delivers his second State of the Union speech to Congress on Tuesday, his guests will include Joshua Trump, a sixth grader passionate about science and animals.
The youngster isn't a member of the president's family, but instead a boy from Wilmington, Delaware, who has been bullied in school as a result of his last name, according to a short statement issued the White House.
"He appreciates science, art, and history," the statement said.
"He also loves animals and hopes to pursue a related career in the future," it continued, adding young Trump's hero and best friend is his Uncle Cody, a member of the United States Air Force.
"Unfortunately, Joshua has been bullied in school due to his last name. He is thankful to the First Lady and the Trump family for their support," the statement concluded.
The president, first lady, and the 535 members of Congress are permitted to invite guests to the annual speech, a key fixture in the American political calendar which sees the US leader tout their successes and outline goals.
The first couple's other guests include family members of Gerald and Sharon David, an elderly couple killed in January allegedly by an undocumented immigrant; and Matthew Charles, a former drug dealer who turned his life around in prison and was the first person released under a criminal justice reform law passed in December.


Afghan government, Taliban announce breakthrough deal to press on with peace talks

Updated 02 December 2020

Afghan government, Taliban announce breakthrough deal to press on with peace talks

Afghan government, Taliban announce breakthrough deal to press on with peace talks
  • The agreement lays out the way forward for further discussion
  • Taliban insurgents have refused to agree to a cease-fire during the preliminary stages of talks

KABUL: Afghan government and Taliban representatives said on Wednesday they had reached a preliminary deal to press on with peace talks, their first written agreement in 19 years of war.
The agreement lays out the way forward for further discussion but is considered a breakthrough because it will allow negotiators to move on to more substantive issues, including talks on a cease-fire.
“The procedure including its preamble of the negotiation has been finalized and from now on, the negotiation will begin on the agenda,” Nader Nadery, a member of the Afghan government’s negotiating team, told Reuters.
The Taliban spokesman confirmed the same on Twitter.
The agreement comes after months of discussions in Doha, the capital of Qatar, in negotiations encouraged by the United States. In Afghanistan, the two sides are still at war, with Taliban attacks on government forces continuing unabated.
Taliban insurgents have refused to agree to a cease-fire during the preliminary stages of talks, despite calls from Western capitals and global bodies, saying that that would be taken up only when the way forward for talks was agreed upon.
UN envoy for Afghanistan Deborah Lyons welcomed the “positive development” on Twitter, adding that “this breakthrough should be a springboard to reach the peace wanted by all Afghans.”
Last month, an agreement reached between Taliban and government negotiators was held up at the last minute after the insurgents balked at the document’s preamble because it mentioned the Afghan government by name.
The Taliban refused to refer to the Afghan negotiating team as representatives of the Afghan government, as they contest the legitimacy of the administration led by President Ashraf Ghani.