New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

1 / 2
Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
2 / 2
Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his family. (Facebook)
Updated 16 March 2019

New Zealand terrorist attack: 4 Jordanians dead, 5 injured

  • Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced the killing of Khaled Haj Musatafa in the shooting
  • Eight others injured, among those two in critical condition

DUBAI: Four Jordanians were killed and five others injured - with two in critical condition - during the New Zealand terrorist attack on two mosques on Friday.

On Friday, Jordan's Foreign Ministry announced that Khaled Haj Musatafa was killed in the attack, while Jordanian barber Wasseim Alsati and his daughter were among those critically injured. The foreign ministry said efforts are being made to provide all assistance and support needed by the victims and their families.

After the incident, Alsati shared a heartfelt video, via his official Facebook account, appealing for people to pray for his injured daughter and confirmed his condition was “hopefully” stable.
“Please pray for my son and my daughters, hopefully she will be so much better,” he said.

 

 

“I’m very sorry I have not been able to answer your calls and messages right now, I am really tired,” Alsati added, saying “it has been a pleasure to know you all and thank you for the support and all the help that you have given me so far.”

Alsati opened up a barber shop called Wass’ Barbers in Christchurch, where he and his family have been living for many years.

Wasseim was hit with four bullets, two in his back, one in the stomach and another in his foot, while his daughter was hit with three bullets.

Read more: At least 49 killed as gunman livestreams New Zealand mosque ‘terrorist attacks’

Jordanian Foreign ministry said in a statement in the aftermath of the shooting incident that it is believed that two Jordanians were among the victims of the terrorist attacks.

The ministry added that they are following up on the matter to ensure the victims are safe and are being treated accordingly. Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi said on his twitter account “We condemn the horrific barbaric attacks against innocent worshippers in #NewZealandShooting mosque. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Terrorism in all its forms and it’s ideology of hate is a common enemy that we must fight together.”

At least 49 people, including children, were killed, and 50 others critically injured when a gunman opened fire on Masjid Al Noor mosque and Linwood mosque in New Zealand.

Read more: Muslim world reacts at New Zealand terrorist attacks on mosque

New Zealand police detained three men and a woman, with one of them being charged with murder. 

One of four people detained in New Zealand after mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch is Australian, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said.


Egyptian festival celebrates Aragouz traditions

Updated 25 November 2020

Egyptian festival celebrates Aragouz traditions

  • The festival this year sheds light on the creative icons that inspired the aragouz

CAIRO: The second Egyptian Aragouz Festival has opened on Nov. 24, at the ancient Bayt Al-Sinnari, in Cairo. The aragouz is a traditional puppet figure dressed in red invented by Egyptians to ridicule situations comically.

Khaled Bahgat, a professor of theater at Helwan University and the founder of the festival and the Wamda Troupe for Aragouz and Shadow Puppets, said the festival is part of the initiative to preserve the Egyptian aragouz, after it was recognized by UNESCO in 2018 as one of the most important Egyptian artistic elements. He said that he wants the Egyptian art of aragouz to reach the world because it is an ancient Egyptian art.

The festival this year sheds light on the creative icons that inspired the aragouz.

The festival opened with a tribute to the great Egyptian creator Abu Al-Saud Al-Abyari in a reading of his story “Aragouz, Author and Idea,” which he published in 1953. Al-Aragouz was an important source of creativity for Al-Abyari.

The reading was followed by entries exploring how the art of aragouz shaped Egyptian comedy in the twentieth century.

The day closed with puppet performances of “The social media aragouz,” which reflected the impact of social media, directed by Ali Abu Zeid, and “The aragouz in the city,” directed by Nabil Bahgat.

On the second day, Reem Heggab will honor her father the late Egyptian poet Said Heggab, reciting one of his poems on the aragouz. This will be followed by two aragouz shows, “The Take Away,” directed by Mahmoud Sayed Hanafi, and “Aragouz, the Land of Myths.”

On Thursday, the theater department of the University of Alexandria will celebrate the aragouz with a lecture by Hany Abou El-Hassan, the head of the department, a workshop and a performance titled “Lorca and the aragouz,” directed by Nabil Bahgat and presented by the Wamda Troupe.

The performance honors the creativity of the Spanish poet and innovator Federico García Lorca, and will be held in the presence of the Spanish cultural attache.

The fourth day of the festival will honor the poet Fouad Haddad, whose son Amin Haddad will recite several poems from his father’s book of poetry entitiled Al-Aragouz. The poetry reading will be followed by a discussion.

Then there will be performances of “Aragouz Al Sima,” directed by Mustafa Al-Sabbagh, and “Al-Aragouz in Danger,” which deals with the greatest challenges facing the art of aragouz.

On the last day, the Faculty of Arts at Helwan University and the Department of Theater Sciences’ troupe will hold an open seminar with the department’s students to discuss ways to preserve the Egyptian aragouz.